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Protein polymorphisms

In an Advanced Online Publication from Nature Genetics, Klose at al. describe a comprehensive genetic study of proteins in the murine brain (Nat Genet 2002, DOI:10.1038/ng861).They took advantage of crosses from the European collaborative interspecific backcross (EUCIB) project, and prepared brain tissues from 200 backcross progeny (B1) animals. Klose at al. then analyzed the brain proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comparison of over 8000 gel spots from two distantly related mo

Jonathan Weitzman(jonathanweitzman@hotmail.com)

In an Advanced Online Publication from Nature Genetics, Klose at al. describe a comprehensive genetic study of proteins in the murine brain (Nat Genet 2002, DOI:10.1038/ng861).

They took advantage of crosses from the European collaborative interspecific backcross (EUCIB) project, and prepared brain tissues from 200 backcross progeny (B1) animals. Klose at al. then analyzed the brain proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comparison of over 8000 gel spots from two distantly related mouse strains (Mus musculus C57BL/6 and M. spretus SPR) led to the identification of over 1000 polymorphic proteins that differed either qualitatively or quantitatively. They then mapped the genetic loci corresponding to hundreds of these protein variants.

Quantitative differences were often associated with allele-specific variation, but additional loci also contributed to protein polymorphisms, emphasizing the importance of polygenic modifier effects.

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