ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Research explores development of babies' brains

Between the ages of six and eight months, babies' brains go through a crucial stage of development that allows them to begin to make sense of objects.

(medwire@sciencenow.com)

Research published in 24 November Science has shown that babies' brains seem to go through a crucial stage of development between the ages of six and eight months. Csibra et al used a sophisticated system of sensors in an attempt to discover at what point babies begin to make sense of objects and shapes in the world around them.

A total of 11 six-month-old and 11 eight-month-old babies were assessed for the study. The researchers placed a 'geodesic sensor net' made up of 64 sensors onto the babies' scalps, and then showed them a group of four 'Pacman' shapes collectively known as a Kanizsa Square. When placed with the four 'mouths' facing inwards, the shapes create the optical illusion of a square. Previous research has shown that adult brains produce a characteristic signal of gamma oscillations when shown a Kanizsa Square. The eight-month-old babies also produced such a signal, suggesting...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT