A View From the Benches

Scientists submitted more than 5,100 abstracts to the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in New Orleans, March 24-28. Many abstracts focused on hot topics such as angiogenesis and apoptosis. Studies of breast and prostate cancer abounded, as did jazzy work using DNA microarrays. A large bloc of intriguing abstracts, however, explored the less traveled byways of cancer research. Selected almost at random, a handful of such abstracts, and the posters and a talk e

Douglas Steinberg
Apr 29, 2001
Scientists submitted more than 5,100 abstracts to the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in New Orleans, March 24-28. Many abstracts focused on hot topics such as angiogenesis and apoptosis. Studies of breast and prostate cancer abounded, as did jazzy work using DNA microarrays. A large bloc of intriguing abstracts, however, explored the less traveled byways of cancer research. Selected almost at random, a handful of such abstracts, and the posters and a talk elaborating on them, are discussed here in a reporter's notebook format. More information and the poster abstracts are available on the AACR Web site (www.aacr.org).

Early Warning of a Killer

A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PCA) is still virtually a death sentence. The five-year survival rate stands at 4 percent. In the United States, PCA is fourth among cancers in the number of deaths it causes, with 29,000 expected in...

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