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PLANT AND ANIMAL SCIENCES BY FRANCISCO J. AYALA Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology University of California, Irvine Irvine, Calif. " Infanticide has evolved in some animals as a behavior that increases the fitness of the killer. Killing of siblings occurs in birds, amphibians, fishes, and a number of invertebrates. Killing or abandonment of offspring occurs in many vertebrates (as well as humans). A special case of this is filial cannibalism. In the cortez damselflsh, Stegastes

Francisco Ayala
Apr 2, 1989

PLANT AND ANIMAL SCIENCES

BY FRANCISCO J. AYALA
Department of Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology
University of California, Irvine
Irvine, Calif.

" Infanticide has evolved in some animals as a behavior that increases the fitness of the killer. Killing of siblings occurs in birds, amphibians, fishes, and a number of invertebrates. Killing or abandonment of offspring occurs in many vertebrates (as well as humans). A special case of this is filial cannibalism. In the cortez damselflsh, Stegastes rectzfraenum, males defend eggs deposited on rock surfaces within their territories. Males eat a large percentage of the egg clutches they receive, preferentially those that are smaller and at early stages of development. Females preferentially deposit eggs with males caring for other early-stage eggs and avoid males with late-stage eggs.

C.W. Petersen, K. Marchetti, “Filial cannibalism in the cortez damselflsh stegastes rectifraenun,”Evolution, 43, 158-68, Jan- uary 1989.

" The deep-sea bottom...

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