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COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCES BY BRUCE G. BUCHANANBR> Department of Computer Science University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, Pa. " Are computer-based text editors more efficient for reading and writing than conventional paper documents? Many factors influence the answer, seven of which were reported in a recent study. Advanced workstations offer enough advantages over personal computers, partly because there is more flexibilty in the user interface. Neither is superior to paper for reading (or proofre

Bruce Buchanan

COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCES

BY BRUCE G. BUCHANANBR> Department of Computer Science
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, Pa.

" Are computer-based text editors more efficient for reading and writing than conventional paper documents? Many factors influence the answer, seven of which were reported in a recent study. Advanced workstations offer enough advantages over personal computers, partly because there is more flexibilty in the user interface. Neither is superior to paper for reading (or proofreading); results with workstation-based editors on writing tasks are more encouraging, but still not conclusive.

W.J. Hansen, C. Haas, "Reading and writing with computers: a framework for explaining differences in performance," Communications of the ACM, 31 (9), 1080-9, September 1988.

" Chess has long been considered a good test of computers' problem-solving skills. A report on last year's tournament (with two annotated games) reviews results in this area of computing.

M. Newborn, D. Kopec, "Results of...

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