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LIFE SCIENCES BY BERNARD DIXON European Editorial Offices The Scientist Uxbridge, U.K. "Are the malignancies in AIDS patients secondary consequences of their immunodeficient state? Or are they caused by the virus itself? New evidence suggests that the principal type of tumor is induced by a single viral gene. But why, then, is that tumor almost unknown in hemophiliacs with AIDS? J. Vogel, S.H. Hinricha, R.K. Reynolds, P.A. Luciw, G. Jay, “The HIV tat gene induces dermal lesions resemb

Bernard Dixon

LIFE SCIENCES

BY BERNARD DIXON
European Editorial Offices
The Scientist
Uxbridge, U.K.

"Are the malignancies in AIDS patients secondary consequences of their immunodeficient state? Or are they caused by the virus itself? New evidence suggests that the principal type of tumor is induced by a single viral gene. But why, then, is that tumor almost unknown in hemophiliacs with AIDS?

J. Vogel, S.H. Hinricha, R.K. Reynolds, P.A. Luciw, G. Jay, “The HIV tat gene induces dermal lesions resembling Kaposi’s sarcoma in transgenic mice,” Nature, 335 (6191), 606-11, 13 October 1988.

" Although the engineering of antibodies is barely four years old, progress has been astonishingly fast. This year’s arguably most spectacular breakthrough is the production of a catalytic antibody that can wrench amide bonds apart—presaging “abzymes” for cutting proteins at specific sites.

K.D. Janda, D. Schloeder, S.J. Benkovic, R.A. Lerner, “Induction of an antibody that catalyzes the hydrolysis...

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