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Identifying 1996's Most-Cited Articles And Hottest Authors

Editor's Note: For the fifth year in a row, the newsletter Science Watch has identified the most cited research articles of the preceding year and determined who were the top producers of these "hot" papers. Based on citation records compiled by the Philadelphia-based Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), analysts prepared the rankings for 1996. "Hot" papers are research articles that have been referenced in subsequent papers-in this case, between November 1994 and December 1996-more fre

The Scientist Staff

Editor's Note: For the fifth year in a row, the newsletter Science Watch has identified the most cited research articles of the preceding year and determined who were the top producers of these "hot" papers. Based on citation records compiled by the Philadelphia-based Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), analysts prepared the rankings for 1996. "Hot" papers are research articles that have been referenced in subsequent papers-in this case, between November 1994 and December 1996-more frequently than other articles of the same type and vintage.

For the first time in four years, a new researcher has garnered the most hot papers. Roger J. Davis, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, was a coauthor of 11 of the most-cited articles. In the past, molecular biologists Bert Vogelstein and Kenneth Kinzler from Johns Hopkins University were repeatedly in the top slot.

Science Watch's March/April 1997...

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