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Mayo Team Of MD's Advances Field Of Vascular Biology

In the medical research arena, the M.D.'s have generally stuck with their stethoscopes, leaving the work of discovering to the Ph.D.'s. But at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., a research group led by cardiologist John C. Burnett, Jr., and composed entirely of medical doctors is charging ahead to decipher the physiologic role of endothelin, a peptide that causes narrowing of the blood vessels. For the most part, endothelin has been the focus of investigations by molecular biologists and bio

Paul Kefalides
In the medical research arena, the M.D.'s have generally stuck with their stethoscopes, leaving the work of discovering to the Ph.D.'s. But at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., a research group led by cardiologist John C. Burnett, Jr., and composed entirely of medical doctors is charging ahead to decipher the physiologic role of endothelin, a peptide that causes narrowing of the blood vessels.

For the most part, endothelin has been the focus of investigations by molecular biologists and biochemists--not clinicians. During the past year, however, Burnett and his team have added a new dimension to endothelin research; a dimension that has received considerable attention from the rest of the research community.

John Burnett's team has been on a winning streak in the past few months as the Mayo group of clinicians had two more endothelin studies accepted for publication: one appeared in the August issue of the American Journal...

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