Molecular Structures Provide Insights Into Larger Questions In Biology

Editor's Note: This is the second part of a two-part series on the field of structural biology. Part 1, presented in the Aug. 22, 1994, issue of The Scientist (page 14), discussed the evolution of this booming discipline. This article focuses on structural biology's key areas of basic and applied research and looks ahead to its future. Following are some of the professional organizations whose memberships include structural biolo

Neeraja Sankaran
Sep 4, 1994
Editor's Note: This is the second part of a two-part series on the field of structural biology. Part 1, presented in the Aug. 22, 1994, issue of The Scientist (page 14), discussed the evolution of this booming discipline. This article focuses on structural biology's key areas of basic and applied research and looks ahead to its future.

Following are some of the professional organizations whose memberships include structural biologists:

American Chemical Society
1155 16th St., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
(202) 872-4600
Fax: (202) 872-4615

Ned Heindel, president
John K. Crum, executive director

American Crystallographic Association
P.O. Box 96, Ellicott Station
Buffalo, N.Y. 14205-0096
(716) 856-9600
Fax: (716) 852-4846
E-mail: acamjv%mfb@ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu

Elinor Adman, president
William L. Duax, executive officer

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
9650 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Md. 20814-3996
(301) 530-7145
Fax: (301) 571-1824

Gordon G. Hammes, president
Charles Hancock, executive officer

Biophysical Society
9650 Rockville Pike
Room...

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