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Courtesy of Nadine Barrie Smith  PATCHING THROUGH: The ultrasound patch, weighing less than 22 grams, is an array made from up to four cymbal transducers, encased in a flexible polymer. This array's dimensions are 37 x 37 x 7 mm. It can be made thinner. Proteins represent the largest class of biotech drug ap-provals, and the numbers will continue to rise as work with the human genome sequence proceeds. Figures from 2000 show that 86% of 77 approved biotech medicines are proteins, with hu

Laura Defrancesco
Courtesy of Nadine Barrie Smith
 PATCHING THROUGH: The ultrasound patch, weighing less than 22 grams, is an array made from up to four cymbal transducers, encased in a flexible polymer. This array's dimensions are 37 x 37 x 7 mm. It can be made thinner.

Proteins represent the largest class of biotech drug ap-provals, and the numbers will continue to rise as work with the human genome sequence proceeds. Figures from 2000 show that 86% of 77 approved biotech medicines are proteins, with hundreds more in the pipeline.1

Yet, delivering proteins--that is, getting the drug into the body so that it retains its functionality--is problematic. Pills, by far the preferred method, do not work without some fancy engineering to shepherd the proteins safely through the gastrointestinal tract. And injections are literally a pain. It's no wonder that over 300 companies are designing novel drug delivery systems, according to a...

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