The Microarray Family Tree

Source: Chart created by Eugene Garfield (egarfield@the-scientist.com), founding editor of The Scientist, and Soren Paris. The Historiograph is a chronological linkage map that visualizes the genealogy of the microarray literature. Starting with the Pat Brown group in 19951 (Also, see Foundations) it progresses to analysis, review and implementation in the ensuing years. The 13 key papers are identified through their citation links. Most have been cited highly in the literature and heavily ref

The Scientist Staff
Aug 24, 2003
Source: Chart created by Eugene Garfield (egarfield@the-scientist.com), founding editor of The Scientist, and Soren Paris.

The Historiograph is a chronological linkage map that visualizes the genealogy of the microarray literature. Starting with the Pat Brown group in 19951 (Also, see Foundations) it progresses to analysis, review and implementation in the ensuing years. The 13 key papers are identified through their citation links. Most have been cited highly in the literature and heavily referenced by a group of roughly 3,000 papers with the word "microarray" appearing in the title.

To see the data from which the chart is drawn, visit:
http://garfield.library.upenn.edu/histcomp/microarray/

For a guide to reading historiograph data, visit:
http://garfield.library.upenn.edu/histcomp/guide.html

References
1. M. Schena, D. Shalon, R.W. Davis, P.O. Brown, "Quantitative monitoring of gene-expression patterns with a complementary-DNA microarray," Science, 270:467-70, Oct. 20, 1995. (cited in 1,661 papers)

2. M. Schena, D. Shalon, R. Heller,...

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