Research
A Push and a Pull for PARP-1 in Aging
Jack Lucentini(jlucentini@the-scientist.com) | Aug 1, 2005
Understanding the mechanisms that underlie aging remains a bedeviling problem, but not because of a lack of answers.
Plant Neurobiology Sprouts Anew
Trevor Stokes(tstokes@the-scientist.com) | Jul 18, 2005
A meeting this past May ushered in the birth, or perhaps rebirth, of a field of study in which the controversy starts at the very name.
Cancer Epigenetics Enters the Mainstream
Mark Greener(mgreener@the-scientist.com) | Jun 20, 2005
has guided cancer research for decades.
MicroRNA Target Practice
Douglas Steinberg(dsteinberg@the-scientist.com) | Jun 20, 2005
About a month before a New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) meeting last February, six of the scheduled speakers received an unusual homework assignment.
"Industrial" Pollutants Reveal a Surprising Origin
Stuart Blackman(sblackman@the-scientist.com) | Jun 6, 2005
chemicals synthesized for use as industrial flame retardants and regarded as persistent environmental pollutants.
Secondary Endosymbiosis Exposed
Jack Lucentini(jlucentini@the-scientist.com) | Jun 6, 2005
Photo: Nils Kroger, Regensburg UniversityLast summer's publication of the first diatom genome provided insight into the workings of a tiny organism with huge potential for environmental, industrial, and research applications.1 A growing appreciation of the sequence, however, has begun to divulge one of nature's wilder and most productive experiments.Diatoms, a diverse division of one-celled ocean algae with gemlike silica casings, are thought to collectively absorb as much carbon dioxide through
Turning Back the Tuberculosis Tide
Eugene Russo(erusso@the-scientist.com) | May 23, 2005
An ancient scourge, tuberculosis has made a comeback in recent years.
Taking the Lid Off the Molecular Garbage Pail
Megan Stephan(mstephan@the-scientist.com) | May 9, 2005
a last resting place for worn-out, misfolded, or otherwise unwanted proteins.
Longevity
Jill Adams(juadams@the-scientist.com) | May 9, 2005
During autophagy-literally "self-eating"-cells deliver cytoplasmic constituents, including whole organelles, to the lysosome for degradation.
A Peek at the Pore
Bennett Daviss(bdaviss@the-scientist.com) | Apr 25, 2005
As the gateway to the nucleus, the nuclear pore complex manages hundreds of intricate cargo-handling operations every second.