Sneak Preview

Science Seen | Sneak Preview Specimen courtesy of Andrew Koff, Anxo Vidal Image courtesy of Tim Bromage, Nancy Yeh  SNEAK PREVIEW: Using a technique called AutoMontage, which combines multiple, partially focused digital images, researchers captured skeletal development in a 16 1/2-day-old knockout mouse embryo, in which a gene coding for an enzyme responsible for cell division was inactivated. The embryo was stained to reveal cartilage (blue) and mineralized bone (red). function sen

The Scientist Staff
Jun 1, 2003

Science Seen | Sneak Preview


Specimen courtesy of Andrew Koff, Anxo Vidal
Image courtesy of Tim Bromage, Nancy Yeh
 SNEAK PREVIEW: Using a technique called AutoMontage, which combines multiple, partially focused digital images, researchers captured skeletal development in a 16 1/2-day-old knockout mouse embryo, in which a gene coding for an enzyme responsible for cell division was inactivated. The embryo was stained to reveal cartilage (blue) and mineralized bone (red).



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