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"human connectome project"

Smell May Be Possible Without Olfactory Bulbs
Smell May Be Possible Without Olfactory Bulbs
Jef Akst | Nov 6, 2019
A study identifies five women who have a functioning sense of smell despite an apparent lack of olfactory bulbs—the region of the brain that processes odors.
Mapping the Human Connectome
Mapping the Human Connectome
Tanya Lewis | Jul 20, 2016
A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.
TS Picks: September 29, 2015
TS Picks: September 29, 2015
Tracy Vence | Sep 29, 2015
Detailing publication contributions; mining human connectomes; all about mutations
Week in Review: October 12–16
Week in Review: October 12–16
Tracy Vence | Oct 16, 2015
Connectome fingerprints; transposon-thwarting protein; skipping cell line validation; more peer review manipulation
Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses
Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses
Anna Azvolinsky | Apr 7, 2016
Analyzing resting brain scans, researchers can anticipate the brain activities of a person performing a range of tasks. 
New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience
New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience
Alison F. Takemura | Oct 1, 2016
Imaging and manipulating the brain has come a long way from electrodes and the patch clamp, though such traditional tools remain essential.
Brain Activity Identifies Individuals
Brain Activity Identifies Individuals
Kerry Grens | Oct 12, 2015
Neural connectome patterns differ enough between people to use them as a fingerprint.
Image of the Day: Brain Fibers
Image of the Day: Brain Fibers
The Scientist Staff | Jun 24, 2013
White matter fibers of the human brain are tracked with diffusion tensor imaging.
White’s the Matter
White’s the Matter
Kelly Rae Chi | Nov 1, 2014
A basic guide to white matter imaging using diffusion MRI
Image of the Day: Brain Wiring
Image of the Day: Brain Wiring
The Scientist Staff | Feb 20, 2013
Neural pathways form a mesh, with yellow representing language and connecting the frontal lobe on the left to the temporal lobe on the right, and the purple curlicue representing Broca's area, which coordinates speech.

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