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The Age of Pharmabrewing
The Age of Pharmabrewing
Laura Marengo and John D. Loike | Jan 1, 2016
We should not resist developing opiate-producing GM yeast for fear of the technology falling into the wrong hands.
When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
John D. Loike | Jul 1, 2015
Ethical issues attend the creation of animal-human chimeras.
Loaded Words
Loaded Words
John D. Loike | Dec 1, 2014
As new technologies emerge, we must choose our words for them with care: names can negatively bias the inevitable debates over the ethics of scientific advances.
Opinion: Translational Biotechnology
Opinion: Translational Biotechnology
John D. Loike and Jennifer E. Miller | Feb 17, 2014
Regulators must consider both the promise and potential pitfalls of new technologies when determining whether to move them into clinical trials.
A Can of Worms
Sabrina Richards | Jun 1, 2012
Scientists at the American Museum of Natural History use DNA barcoding to show that even sardines infected with nematodes can still be kosher.
Three-Way Parenthood
Three-Way Parenthood
Yehezkel Margalit, John D. Loike, Michio Hirano | Oct 1, 2013
Avoiding the transmission of mitochondrial disease takes a trio, but raises a host of logistical issues.
Contagion: Science Fact?
Tia Ghose | Sep 16, 2011
Soderbergh’s new pandemic thriller gets a lot of the science right, but does contain a few unlikely details.
Benefits of the stem cell ban
John D. Loike and Ruth L. Fischbach | Jun 8, 2009
Federal aversion to embryonic stem cell research had a silver lining: it galvanized the development of new biotechnologies in stem cell science, two bioethicists argue
Basic Research Support
Wells Farnsworth | Apr 4, 1994
First, they reported, investigators fail to credit National Institutes of Health sponsorship of their work. Second, they noted, researchers do not clearly communicate the significance and utility of their basic findings to the advancement of medicine, the environment, or the economy. Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), for example, views basic science efforts as "curiosity-driven activities," which she equates with pork. Members of Cong
Basic Research Support
Wells Farnsworth | Apr 4, 1994
First, they reported, investigators fail to credit National Institutes of Health sponsorship of their work. Second, they noted, researchers do not clearly communicate the significance and utility of their basic findings to the advancement of medicine, the environment, or the economy. Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), for example, views basic science efforts as "curiosity-driven activities," which she equates with pork. Members of Cong

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