Slideshows
Bug Fest 2011
Bug Fest 2011
Edyta Zielinska | Aug 25, 2011
Earlier this month (August 13-14) thousands of children and bug-loving adults descended on the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, where all manner of insect—dead, alive, and deep fried—were on display to be looked at, touched and, yes...eaten.
Haeckel’s Radiolarians
Hannah Waters | Aug 1, 2011
After completing his studies in medicine and biology, Prussian naturalist Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859, where, in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the climactic months of his stay glued to his microscope observing and sketching.
Battling Malaria in Africa
Jef Akst | Aug 1, 2011
When general practitioner John Lusingu returned to his native Tanzania to do research on malaria, he was met with a total lack of science infrastructure. 
Repainting Ancient Birds
Megan Scudellari | Jul 1, 2011
Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of trace metals in avian fossils over 120 million-year-old, researchers reconstruct the pigment patterns of their feathers—revealing some of the extinct birds' long-lost colors.
Best in Academia, 2011
The Scientist Staff | Jul 1, 2011
Meet some of the finalists of this year's Best Places to Work in Academia survey. 
Fish fear from above
Fish fear from above
Cristina Luiggi | Jun 15, 2011
Coral reefs are fraught with danger for herbivores such as damselfish and tangs. Venturing out from the safety of the reef’s colorful cracks and crevices to feed means risking being devoured by predators that patrol the warm waters. 
Primal Fashion
Primal Fashion
Cristina Luiggi | Jun 9, 2011
Two sisters—Kate, a developmental biologist, and Helen, a high-end fashion designer—team up to develop a couture collection inspired by the first 1,000 hours of embryonic life. 
Medical Posters
Medical Posters
Edyta Zielinska | Jun 7, 2011
William Helfand began buying medically themed collectibles in the 1950s when he started working for Merck & Co. Over his 30-year career with the company, Helfand amassed thousands of posters and other old marketing paraphernalia.
Tibetan medical paintings
Cristina Luiggi | May 15, 2011
Seventeenth-century Tibet witnessed a blossoming of medical knowledge, with the construction of a monastic medical college and the penning of several influential medical texts. Perhaps most striking was a set of 79 paintings, known as tangkas, which
Inside the mind of Fritz Kahn
Cristina Luiggi | Feb 1, 2011
For more than 40 years, German gynecologist and legendary science writer Fritz Kahn (1888-1968) captured the imagination of an international audience with hundreds of wildly inventive illustrations and more than a dozen popular science books.