So They Say

So They Say "Remember, this was probably the most prolific man in history. He had a lot of children." --Oxford geneticist Chris Tyler-Smith discussing the logistical workings of his theory, which traces 8% of Central Asian men as direct patrilineal descendants of Genghis Khan. From The Scientist. "It was absolutely safe to transport it the way he did." --Attorney Floyd Holder explaining why his client, Texas Tech University biologist Thomas Butler, felt assured to carry glass-encased pl

The Scientist Staff
Apr 6, 2003

So They Say


"Remember, this was probably the most prolific man in history. He had a lot of children."

--Oxford geneticist Chris Tyler-Smith discussing the logistical workings of his theory, which traces 8% of Central Asian men as direct patrilineal descendants of Genghis Khan. From The Scientist.

"It was absolutely safe to transport it the way he did."

--Attorney Floyd Holder explaining why his client, Texas Tech University biologist Thomas Butler, felt assured to carry glass-encased plague samples onto commercial airliners. Butler is charged with misleading investigators when some samples could not be found. From the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal.

"Last semester I was an accounting major. I think I made a good switch."

--New geology-major Sarah Kee, after discovering the world's largest (2.5 meters) actinoceratoid nautiloid fossil, dated at 325 million years old, on a class field trip. From Science.

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