Speaking of Science image
Speaking of Science image

Ten Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse

Emily Cox and Henry Rathvon
Dec 1, 2021

ABOVE: The Scientist Staff

Click the puzzle for a full-size, interactive version.
Note: The answer grid will include every letter of the alphabet.
BY EMILY COX AND HENRY RATHvON

I think there needs to be a balance between fundamental curiosity-driven science and applied science, because we need each other. The fundamental science often goes in unexpected directions and leads to advances that wouldn’t have been made otherwise, and CRISPR is certainly in that category.

—University of California, Berkeley, researcher Jennifer Doudna, Nobel Prize–winning codeveloper of CRISPR gene editing, speaking with the Association of American Medical Colleges about the most pressing issues facing the academic medical community (November 8)
ACROSS

1. Country home to Miombo woodlands
9. Item on a chemist’s table
10. Family relative of lilac and jasmine
11. Vessel connecting ventricle and abdomen
12. Upper fixed bone of the jaw
13. Apple or potato variety
14. Max of constant fame
18. Nicotiana member
21. Olfactory channels
23. Strongest bone in the human body
24. Most abundant monosaccharide
25. Secretion that nourishes queen bees (2 wds.)

DOWN

2. Perform in a surgical theater
3. Time for a foliage tour
4. Zoological park site since 1899
5. Hollow shaft of a feather
6. Where corneas may be found (2 wds.)
7. Some intravenous injections
8. Features of wheat or barbets
13. “Wheel animalcule”
15. Pertaining to the 17-Down
16. Descriptor of the small intestine
17. Site of gustatory cells
19. Like skin with keratosis pilaris
20. Calcareous deposit
22. Undergo molting

We found that when researchers report that males and females respond differently to a manipulation such as a drug treatment, 70 percent of the time the researchers have not actually compared those responses statistically at all. In other words, an alarming percentage of claims of sex differences are not backed by sufficient evidence.

—Emory University neuroscientist Donna Maney, in a press release reporting the publication of a recent eLife paper she coauthored analyzing data from dozens of 2019 studies (November 9)
© JONNY HAWKINS