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Capital of the World

New York City is a diverse center of internationalism, and its scientific resources mirror that diversity, say researchers.

Vicki Brower
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New York City is a diverse center of internationalism, and its scientific resources mirror that diversity, say researchers. The city's teaching institutions draw a high percentage of top-notch individuals from around the world. Mount Sinai Medical Center, for example, currently hosts postdoctoral fellows from 45 nations, and PhD and MD/PhD students from 25 countries in Europe, Africa and Asia, including places such as Albania, Lebanon, Armenia, Ghana, Thailand, and Taiwan, according to Mount Sinai's associate director of external affairs Debra Kaplan.

"New York City is a magnet especially for scientists from Europe and Asia because of its cosmopolitan character – its style of living, population density, public transportation, and just the city's internationalism," says Savio Woo, professor and chair of gene and cell medicine since 1996, when he joined Mount Sinai from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, where he had been for 23 years prior....

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