Contributors
Contributors
Meet some of the people featured in the June 2020 issue of The Scientist.
Contributors
Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2020 issue of The Scientist.

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2020 issue of The Scientist.

aquaporins, evolution
How Squirrels Use Bird Chatter to Assess Safety
Shawna Williams | Jun 1, 2020
An undergraduate research project finds the animals are tuned in to reassuring information from other species.
The Hidden World of Millipede Sex
Yao-Hua Law | Jun 1, 2020
Researchers use advanced imaging techniques to see what happens when a male and a female mate.
Protein Synthesis Enzymes Have Evolved Additional Jobs
Amber Dance | Jun 1, 2020
Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which help translate the genetic code into protein, also function in angiogenesis, fat metabolism, and more.
Revolutionary Repurposing
Neil Shubin | Jun 1, 2020
Evolution needn’t make improbable leaps to facilitate transitions into uncharted biological territory. Adapting new uses for existing structures works just fine.
Variants in Water Channel Gene Tied to More Restful Sleep
Abby Olena | May 12, 2020
The gene, aquaporin-4, is critical in rodents for the cerebrospinal fluid bath the brain gets during sleep. It’s now also tied to slow wave electrical activity during deep sleep in people.
artifacts homo sapiens ancient hominin neanderthal bulgaria cave
45,000-Year-Old Human Remains Found in Bulgarian Cave
Jef Akst | May 12, 2020
A tooth and six bone fragments are the oldest confirmed Homo sapiens fossils in Europe.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2020
Meet some of the people featured in the May 2020 issue of The Scientist.
robert carroll redpath museum mcgill university paleontology obituary vertebrate amphibian evolution coronavirus covid-19 pandemic
Robert Carroll, Who Studied Amphibian Evolution, Dies
Emma Yasinski | Apr 23, 2020
The McGill University paleontologist, who died from COVID-19, was known for using multidisciplinary methods to explore the origins of amphibians, birds, and mammals.
Image of the Day: Olfactory Capacities
Amy Schleunes | Apr 15, 2020
Most small amphibious mammals have a diminished sense of smell, a quality that likely arose because of a tradeoff with thermoregulation capacities that allowed them to conserve heat in aquatic environments.
Image of the Day: Structural Colors
Amy Schleunes | Apr 14, 2020
The films coating buckeye butterflies’ wing scales vary in thickness, creating a broad spectrum of iridescent colors.  
Image of the Day: Ancient Fiber Technology
Amy Schleunes | Apr 13, 2020
Researchers discover a fragment of cord between 41,000 and 52,000 years old that points to Neanderthals’ complex cognitive abilities.
Another Ancient Primate Lineage Sailed to South America
Lisa Winter | Apr 10, 2020
A new fossil discovery indicates a second primate group also traversed the Atlantic millions of years ago on a raft of vegetation.
Image of the Day: Slow-Growing Brains
Amy Schleunes | Apr 8, 2020
Scans of eight fossilized adult and infant Australopithecus afarensis skulls reveal a prolonged period of brain growth during development that may have set the stage for extended childhood learning in later hominins.
Aquatic Apes?
The Scientist Staff | Apr 1, 2020
Watch Reading Frames author Peter Rhys-Evans and documentarian Sir David Attenborough discuss the book The Waterside Ape and the impact it may have on our understanding of human evolution.
Infographic: Researchers Take Aim at Cancer Evolution
Catherine Offord | Apr 1, 2020
Strategies to trick, manipulate, and direct the evolution of tumors
Cancer Researchers Use Evolution to Target Drug Resistance
Catherine Offord | Apr 1, 2020
New therapeutic approaches in oncology aim to manipulate or block cancer’s adaptation to treatment.
Image of the Day: Plumage Patterns
Amy Schleunes | Mar 23, 2020
An island songbird evolved into five populations of different color variants despite inhabiting territories just 10 kilometers apart.
Image of the Day: Wonderchicken
Amy Schleunes | Mar 20, 2020
A newly discovered fossilized skull is between 66.8 million and 66.7 million years old and bears similarities to modern-day chickens and ducks.
Image of the Day: Tiny Dinosaur
Amy Schleunes | Mar 16, 2020
A roughly 99-million-year-old piece of amber from northern Myanmar contains the skull of what appears to represent the smallest known dinosaur of the Mesozoic era.