bacteria, developmental biology, microbiology
Stem Cells Traced To Heart
Tia Ghose | Dec 1, 2011
New research suggests that a controversial class of stem cells originates in the heart and retains some ability to repair damaged tissue.
Astronaut Worms Return from Space
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2011
After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.
Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2011
Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42
Eye of Newt
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.
Newts' New Eyes
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 
Flow Cytometry for the Masses
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.
Breaching the Wall
Rachel Nuwer | Dec 1, 2011
Editor’s choice in immunology
Top 7 in Evolutionary Biology
Jef Akst | Nov 29, 2011
A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in evolutionary biology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000
Infection Selection
Ruth Williams | Nov 13, 2011
Scientists track changes in bacterial genomes during a hospital outbreak to discover potential pathogenesis genes.
Bacterial Identity Crisis
Cristina Luiggi | Nov 9, 2011
Researchers probe the genetics of a group of bacteria known to extensively swap DNA sequences with other species—blurring the species boundaries.