ogre-faced spider Deinopis spinosa metatarsal trichobothria evolution senses hearing vibration sound
This Ogre-Faced Spider Can Hear Prey Through Its Legs
The tropical net-casting spider Deinopis spinosa joins several other arachnid species that can hear sounds from afar without the help of a web, or even ears—an ability that aids its unique hunting tactics.
This Ogre-Faced Spider Can Hear Prey Through Its Legs
This Ogre-Faced Spider Can Hear Prey Through Its Legs

The tropical net-casting spider Deinopis spinosa joins several other arachnid species that can hear sounds from afar without the help of a web, or even ears—an ability that aids its unique hunting tactics.

The tropical net-casting spider Deinopis spinosa joins several other arachnid species that can hear sounds from afar without the help of a web, or even ears—an ability that aids its unique hunting tactics.

behavior, cell & molecular biology
Alterations in Immune Genes Make Bats Great Viral Hosts
Abby Olena | Oct 27, 2020
Bat species use different strategies to dampen immune activation in response to viruses.
SARS-CoV-2 Disables Key Components of Human Cells’ Defense System
Catherine Offord | Oct 22, 2020
Researchers detail how viral proteins interact with host RNA to disrupt the cell’s ability to fight back against infection.
salivary gland new human anatomy head and neck cancer radiation therapy
Scientists Discover New Human Salivary Glands
Diana Kwon | Oct 21, 2020
The findings may have implications for radiotherapy, a cancer treatment that can cause damage to salivary glands and leave lasting complications.
heath hen Tympanuchus cupido de-extinction grouse pgc germline transmission cultured germ cell transmission
The Booming Call of De-extinction
W. S. Roberts | Oct 19, 2020
Scientists seek to combine genome editing with a technique used in chicken breeding to try to bring back lost birds.
Lipid Droplets Are Intracellular Bacteria-Fighting Machines
Ruth Williams | Oct 15, 2020
Far from being inert fat-storage depots within cells, these lipid-loaded organelles recruit immune proteins and block bacterial growth.
Nucleus Is Key to How Cells Sense Personal Space
Abby Olena | Oct 15, 2020
In two independent studies, researchers find that the organelle is responsible for a switch that allows cells to start moving when they’re squeezed.
Decoy Cells Trick SARS-CoV-2, Reduce Cytokines In Vitro
Max Kozlov | Oct 14, 2020
Genetically engineered cells that overproduce ACE2, the receptor the novel coronavirus uses to enter cells, neutralize infection in vitro and mop up inflammatory cytokines in mice.
Electric and Magnetic Field Treatments Lower Mouse Blood Sugar
Abby Olena | Oct 9, 2020
The effects seem to be mediated by a reactive oxygen species in the animals’ livers.
Obituary, University of Oregon, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, chromatin, chromatin reordering, chromatin reprogramming,
Molecular Biologist Jeff McKnight Dies at 36
Amanda Heidt | Oct 8, 2020
The University of Oregon scientist studied the structure and function of chromatin, with the intent of designing new therapeutic tools.
Stomach Acid & Heartburn Drugs Linked with COVID-19 Outcomes
Ashley Yeager | Oct 7, 2020
While sick with COVID-19, President Trump is taking an antacid. Doctors have been exploring whether these medicines can treat SARS-CoV-2 infections, and the results are mixed.
CRISPR, Cas-9, Nobel, Chemistry
CRISPR’s Adaptation to Genome Editing Earns Chemistry Nobel
Amanda Heidt | Oct 7, 2020
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna reprogrammed the bacterial immune response into one of the most popular tools for genetics and molecular biology.
Cheese Preservative Slows Oral Cancer Spread in Mice: Study
Max Kozlov | Oct 1, 2020
The results add to mounting evidence of microbes’ roles in tumor growth and point to the possibility of impeding malignancies by inhibiting bacteria.
Infographic: Measurements that Predict People’s Behavior
Paul J. Zak | Oct 1, 2020
Changes in blood levels of oxytocin and adrenocorticotropic hormone and patterns of neural activity predict how much money people will donate to a cause with high accuracy.
Neurological Correlates Allow Us to Predict Human Behavior
Paul J. Zak | Oct 1, 2020
A combination of factors, from oxytocin release as an indicator of emotional investment to cortisol and other hormones that correlate with attention, can forecast what people will do after an experience.
Infographic: Anatomical Construction by Cell Collectives
Michael Levin | Sep 1, 2020
Understanding this complex and still largely enigmatic process will pave the way for researchers to control the development of new morphologies.
How Groups of Cells Cooperate to Build Organs and Organisms
Michael Levin | Sep 1, 2020
Understanding biology’s software—the rules that enable great plasticity in how cell collectives generate reliable anatomies—is key to advancing tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Sep 1, 2020
Meet some of the people featured in the September 2020 issue of The Scientist.
Ibrahim Cissé’s Tools Provide a Lens to Watch RNA Production
Jef Akst | Sep 1, 2020
The MIT physicist has demonstrated the importance of clusters of RNA polymerase and other transcription mediators in regulating RNA production.
lowland gorilla ace2 spike protein coronavirus sars-cov-2 binding covid-19 pandemic
Modeling Study Flags Species Susceptible to SARS-CoV-2
Anthony King | Aug 26, 2020
Some critically endangered animals are on the list.