WITH VIDEO
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”
A 12-year study shows variation among primate groups in how the animals clasp hands during grooming, but consistency within them, even as group membership shifts over time.
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”

A 12-year study shows variation among primate groups in how the animals clasp hands during grooming, but consistency within them, even as group membership shifts over time.

A 12-year study shows variation among primate groups in how the animals clasp hands during grooming, but consistency within them, even as group membership shifts over time.

behavior, stem cells, membrane proteins
Into the Mind of Human’s Best Friend: Using fMRI to Study Canine Cognition
Into the Mind of Human’s Best Friend: Using fMRI to Study Canine Cognition
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jul 23, 2021
Gregory Berns discusses training dogs to undergo fMRI scans to better understand their brains.
Measuring Membrane Proteins with Mass-Sensitive Particle Tracking
Measuring Membrane Proteins with Mass-Sensitive Particle Tracking
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Refeyn | May 26, 2021
Researchers will discuss a new mass photometry method that characterizes molecules in their native state on supported lipid bilayers.
New Role for Leptin: Promoting Synapse Formation in Rat Neurons
New Role for Leptin: Promoting Synapse Formation in Rat Neurons
Abby Olena | May 20, 2021
The hormone, which is well known for regulating appetite, appears to influence neuronal development—a finding that could shed light on disorders such as autism that involve dysfunctional synapse formation.
When Severed, This Solitary Tunicate Regrows as Three New Animals
When Severed, This Solitary Tunicate Regrows as Three New Animals
Amanda Heidt | May 13, 2021
While regeneration has long been the domain of colonial tunicates, a solitary species of sea squirt was able to regenerate into multiple, fully functional individuals within a month of being cut up.
While Some Sharks Flee, Tiger Sharks Brave Stormy Seas
While Some Sharks Flee, Tiger Sharks Brave Stormy Seas
Nikk Ogasa | May 12, 2021
For the first time, scientists tracked large shark movements during hurricanes and found that tiger sharks may find the turmoil opportunistic for feeding.
A Multipurpose Gene Facilitates the Evolution of an Animal Weapon
A Multipurpose Gene Facilitates the Evolution of an Animal Weapon
Viviane Callier | May 11, 2021
A single gene called BMP11 regulates not only the size and proportions of a water strider’s massively long third legs, but also how it uses the limbs in fights.
Identifying Antibodies that Target Membrane Proteins in Their Native Conformations
Identifying Antibodies that Target Membrane Proteins in Their Native Conformations
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with OXGENE | May 10, 2021
A new mammalian display platform enhances antibody discovery for challenging protein targets.
Amanda Tokash-Peters Links the Microbiome to Ecology
Amanda Tokash-Peters Links the Microbiome to Ecology
Shawna Williams | May 1, 2021
The Centenary University professor studies the far-reaching effects of changes in the gut bacteria of mosquitos and other species.
Human-Monkey Chimeras Shed Light on Development
Human-Monkey Chimeras Shed Light on Development
Abby Olena | Apr 15, 2021
Human stem cells injected into early monkey embryos proliferate and contribute to multiple cell lineages over 20 days of embryonic development.
Harnessing Stem Cells to Model Neurological Disorders
Harnessing Stem Cells to Model Neurological Disorders
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 15, 2021
Optimizing Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting
Optimizing Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting
The Scientist Creative Services Team in Collaboration with BD Biosciences | Apr 12, 2021
Karen Ersland, David Haviland, and Dagna Sheerar discuss how to obtain the best cell samples possible using fluorescence-activated cell sorting.
What a Video Game Can Reveal About Monkeys’ Minds
What a Video Game Can Reveal About Monkeys’ Minds
Shawna Williams | Apr 1, 2021
Researchers find that the animals can account for others’ behavior and circumstances in their strategies.
Technique Talk: Supporting Organoid Growth in 3D Cell Culture
Technique Talk: Supporting Organoid Growth in 3D Cell Culture
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Bio-Techne | Mar 8, 2021
In this workshop, you will learn how to optimally culture organoids and support their growth after genetic manipulation.
Cuttlefish Delay Gratification, a Sign of Smarts
Cuttlefish Delay Gratification, a Sign of Smarts
Asher Jones | Mar 5, 2021
The cephalopods resisted temptation for up to 130 seconds to earn their favorite food, hinting at sophisticated cognitive abilities such as planning for the future.
Slideshow: Watch Insects in Motion
Slideshow: Watch Insects in Motion
Amanda Heidt | Mar 1, 2021
Researchers across disciplines are adopting high-tech tools to better understand the kinematics and behaviors behind insect flight.
Free Fallin’: How Scientists Study Unrestrained Insects
Free Fallin’: How Scientists Study Unrestrained Insects
Amanda Heidt | Mar 1, 2021
Researchers are pulling from video games, sports broadcasting, meteorology, and even missile guidance technology to better investigate how insects have mastered flight.
Infographic: VR, Radar, and Other Tricks for Studying Insects
Infographic: VR, Radar, and Other Tricks for Studying Insects
Amanda Heidt | Mar 1, 2021
Researchers are getting creative to understand flight behavior in the fast-moving and tiny animals.
Promoting Stem Cell Growth and Self-Renewal In Vitro
Promoting Stem Cell Growth and Self-Renewal In Vitro
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with MilliporeSigma | Feb 19, 2021
An engineered laminin substrate facilitates high-quality human stem cell cultures.
Dogs Pass Test for Awareness of Their Own Bodies: Study
Dogs Pass Test for Awareness of Their Own Bodies: Study
Catherine Offord | Feb 18, 2021
Pets asked by their owners to pick up an object attached to a mat they were sitting on understood they needed to move in order to complete the task, researchers report.