A photograph of Christine Guthrie and Hiten Madhani
RNA Pioneer Christine Guthrie Dies at 77
Amanda Heidt | Sep 1, 2022
Guthrie established foundational concepts in the field of pre-mRNA splicing during her career at the University of California, San Francisco.
Kenneth Coale
Biogeochemist Kenneth Coale Dies at 67
Lisa Winter | Aug 4, 2022
He was known for his research on iron’s role in phytoplankton biomass.
Technique Talk: Turning the PAGE—The Dos and Don’ts of Protein Electrophoresis and Western Blotting
Technique Talk: Turning the PAGE—The Dos and Don’ts of Protein Electrophoresis and Western Blotting
The Scientist Creative Services Team and Merck
In this webinar, Kelly Wolfe will discuss innovations that streamline western blotting workflows.
Photo of Makio Murayama
Handmade Hemoglobin, 1912-2012
Dan Robitzski | Aug 1, 2022
Makio Murayama, a Japanese-American biochemist who was turned away from the Manhattan Project due to his heritage, rose to prominence for his work uncovering the link between the structure of hemoglobin and the mechanisms of sickle cell disease.
Amyloid plaques on axons of neurons
The Misunderstood Proteins of Neurodegeneration
Catherine Offord | Aug 1, 2022
The normal functions of peptides that aggregate in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s have been largely overlooked by scientists, but some argue that they are critical for understanding the development of disease.
Technique Talk: Turning the PAGE—The Dos and Don’ts of Protein Electrophoresis and Western Blotting
Technique Talk: Turning the PAGE—The Dos and Don’ts of Protein Electrophoresis and Western Blotting
The Scientist Creative Services Team and MilliporeSigma
In this webinar, Kelly Wolfe will discuss innovations that streamline western blotting workflows.
red ants coming out of dirt hole
Bull Ant Venom Evolved to Make Bites More Painful to Mammals
Dan Robitzski | Jul 5, 2022
A peptide found in bull ant venom closely resembles a hormone of its primary predator, triggering hypersensitivity and making subsequent bites even more painful than the ones that came before.
Green-tinged image of fly eye with shiny and black portions
New CRISPR Technique Causes Few Unintended Mutations in Fruit Flies
Jason P. Dinh | Jul 1, 2022
A study finds that CRISPR-Nickase, which changes just one allele of a given gene, improves gene editing efficiency compared with CRISPR-Cas9.
A visual guide to streamlining high-plex, high-throughput workflows
Simplifying Spatial and Molecular Profiling with End-to-End Services
Canopy Biosciences
A visual guide to streamlining high-plex, high-throughput workflows
Greyhound scratches body from fleas on a green lawn outdoors in a park on a sunny day
New Mechanism for Touch-Evoked Itch Found in Mice
Natalia Mesa | Jun 22, 2022
A previously overlooked protein is important to this type of itch, an insight that could aid the development of new treatments.
portrait of Marilyn Fogel in front of bookcase
Marilyn Fogel, Biogeochemist and “Isotope Queen,” Dies at 69
Andy Carstens | May 25, 2022
Fogel mined information from isotopes to explore modern and ancient ecosystems, climatic changes, and evolution.
Discover how to effectively purify biomolecules with chromatography
Streamlined Purification Workflows for Biomolecule Production
Bio-Rad Laboratories
Researchers optimize chromatography-based workflows to purify biomolecules at scale.
Infographic about SLiMs in SARS-CoV-2 Infection
Infographic: Short Protein Motifs’ Role in SARS-CoV-2 Infection
Conchita Fraguas Bringas and Jakob Nilsson | May 16, 2022
Known as SLiMs, these stretches of up to 10 amino acids play notable roles in cell biology, including responses to viral invasion.
Conceptual image of coronavirus, SARS?Cov?2 infects a human cell
Viruses Target Super-Short Protein Motifs to Disrupt Host Biology
Conchita Fraguas Bringas and Jakob Nilsson | May 16, 2022
Only recently appreciated as critical components of cellular functions, unstructured stretches of amino acids called SLiMs are key to viral-host interactions.
Getting Started with Glycan Screening
Getting Started with Glycan Screening
The Scientist Creative Services Team and Vector Laboratories
In this webinar, August Estabrook will discuss how to use immunofluorescence to screen for glycans.
Illustration of pink strands of RNA on a blue background
Synthetic RNA Can Build Peptides, Hinting at Life’s Beginnings
Jef Akst | May 12, 2022
Researchers engineered strands of RNA that can link amino acids together, suggesting a way that RNA and proteins may have emerged together to create the earliest forms of life.
sunlit coral reef
Corals and Sea Anemones Turn Sunscreen into Toxins—Understanding How Could Help Save Coral Reefs
Djordje Vuckovic and Bill Mitch, The Conversation | May 6, 2022
Researchers have long suspected that an ingredient in sunscreen called oxybenzone was harming corals, but no one knew how. A new study shows how corals turn oxybenzone into a sunlight-activated toxin.
Discover How to Design Sensitive Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Assays
Go with the Flow: Adapting Lateral Flow Assays for Nucleic Acid Detection
The Scientist Creative Services Team and nanoComposix
Scientists incorporate sensitive nanoparticles to rapidly detect DNA and RNA.
Illustration of a meteorite shower heading for Earth
All RNA and DNA Base Types Are Found in Meteorites, Study Claims
Catherine Offord | Apr 27, 2022
The discovery could add weight to the hypothesis that the building blocks of life on Earth originally came from space, but some scientists note the possibility of contamination.
Sidney Altman looks into the camera
Nobel Laureate Sidney Altman Dies At 82
Lisa Winter | Apr 14, 2022
The biophysicist shared the 1989 Prize in Chemistry for discovering RNA’s catalytic properties.