bioethics, immunology, neuroscience
Piggyback Pathogen
Jessica P. Johnson | Sep 1, 2011
Editor’s Choice in Immunology
The Cytokine Cycle
The Cytokine Cycle
W. Sue T. Griffin | Sep 1, 2011
The initiating cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. However, from our studies it’s clear that many types of neuronal damage—­­from traumatic brain injury, to epilepsy, infection, or genetic predisposition—­can activate brain immune cells—microglia and astrocytes-- promoting them to produce IL-1 and S100 inflammatory cytokines.
Hold That Thought
Mary Beth Aberlin | Sep 1, 2011
In the memory circuits of the aging brain and the signaling pathways of pain, science is trading mystery for mastery.
Blood’s Role in the Aging Brain
Edyta Zielinska | Aug 31, 2011
A blood protein involved in allergy contributes to the decline in brain function and memory in aging mice.
Hiding Under a Cap
Richard P. Grant | Aug 30, 2011
Editor's Choice in Immunology
Lessons From Past Unethical Experiments
Cristina Luiggi | Aug 30, 2011
A bioethics commission announces the completion of an investigation into unethical US government-led experiments with STDs in Guatemala in the 1940s.
Soldiers' Amygdalae Show Scars
Kerry Grens | Aug 30, 2011
A year and a half after soldiers have returned from war, impairments in the regulatory circuitry of the amygdala remain.
Top 7 in Neuroscience
Tia Ghose | Aug 23, 2011
A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in neuroscience, from Faculty of 1000
Next Generation: Electronic Skin
Jessica P. Johnson | Aug 17, 2011
Tiny, flexible electronic chips embedded in a skin-like material monitor vitals and stimulate muscles.
Discredited Studies Not Yet Retracted
Jef Akst | Aug 16, 2011
Ten years after an investigative report found that 10 papers on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) were “flawed,” only one has been pulled from the literature.