bioluminescence, cell & molecular biology, evolution
Bacterial Persisters
Bacterial Persisters
Kerry Grens | Jan 1, 2014
A bacterial gene shuts down the cell's own protein synthesis, which sends the bacterium into dormancy and allows it to outlast antibiotics.
Drawn to Controversy
Drawn to Controversy
Megan Scudellari | Jan 1, 2014
By digging through dusty storerooms and reading dead people’s mail, science historian and philosopher Michael Dietrich keeps biologists attuned to the past and mindful of the present.
Evolution’s Stowaways
Evolution’s Stowaways
Alan de Queiroz | Jan 1, 2014
Terrestrial mammals, carnivorous plants, and even burrowing reptiles have spread around the globe by braving the seven seas. These chance ocean crossings are rewriting the story of Earth’s biogeography.
Speaking of Science
Speaking of Science
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2014
January 2014's selection of notable quotes
Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage
Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage
Alan de Queiroz | Jan 1, 2014
In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.
Contributors
Contributors
Abby Olena and Tracy Vence | Jan 1, 2014
Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.
The Bright Side of Prions
The Bright Side of Prions
Randal Halfmann | Jan 1, 2014
Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.
 
New Species Abound
New Species Abound
Jef Akst | Dec 26, 2013
A look at 2013’s noteworthy new species
Top Genomes of 2013
Top Genomes of 2013
Abby Olena | Dec 26, 2013
What researchers learned as they dug through the most highly cited genomes published this year
Top Scientists of 2013
Top Scientists of 2013
Tracy Vence | Dec 25, 2013
The Scientist commemorates prize-winning life scientists and remembers notable researchers who died this year.