books, ecology, evolution
On the Origin of Birds
Cristina Luiggi | Jul 27, 2011
The discovery of a new bird-like fossil challenges longstanding theories about which species of dinosaur gave rise to the avian lineage.
Electric Dolphins?
Jef Akst | Jul 27, 2011
Like many fish and amphibians, the Guiana dolphin can sense low levels of electrical activity in the water—an ability not previously reported in true mammals.
Latitude Affects Human Eye Size
Jef Akst | Jul 27, 2011
People living near the Earth’s poles, where days are often short and light often low, have larger eyes and visual cortices than those closer to the equator.
Chimp Brains Don’t Shrink with Age
Tia Ghose | Jul 25, 2011
Unlike human brains, chimpanzee brains don’t get smaller as they age, suggesting that pronounced neurological decline is a uniquely human byproduct of our oversized brains and extreme longevity.
Behavior Brief
Megan Scudellari | Jul 25, 2011
A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research
Neanderthal DNA in Modern Humans
Jef Akst | Jul 19, 2011
Non-African people carry remnants of the Neanderthal X chromosome, suggesting interbreeding with early human ancestors.
Behavior Brief
Megan Scudellari | Jul 13, 2011
A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research
Dead Cane Toads Are Deadly
Edyta Zielinska | Jul 5, 2011
The deadly-when-eaten invasive amphibians that have been plaguing Australian wildlife for years continue to poison even after they’re dead.
Repainting Ancient Birds
Megan Scudellari | Jul 1, 2011
Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of trace metals in avian fossils over 120 million-year-old, researchers reconstruct the pigment patterns of their feathers—revealing some of the extinct birds' long-lost colors.
A Scar Nobly Got
Michael Willrich | Jul 1, 2011
The story of the US government’s efforts to stamp out smallpox in the early 20th century offers insights into the science and practice of mass vaccination.