Singing Dogs, Once Thought Extinct, Found in the Wild
Singing Dogs, Once Thought Extinct, Found in the Wild
A new genetic analysis confirms prior sightings in New Guinea.
Singing Dogs, Once Thought Extinct, Found in the Wild
Singing Dogs, Once Thought Extinct, Found in the Wild

A new genetic analysis confirms prior sightings in New Guinea.

A new genetic analysis confirms prior sightings in New Guinea.

brain cancer, genetics & genomics
Long-Lasting Wound Infections Linked to Microbes and Genetics
Lisa Winter | Sep 1, 2020
Two gene variations might help explain why some people experience chronic wounds.
Genetics Steps In to Help Tell the Story of Human Origins
Katarina Zimmer | Sep 1, 2020
Africa’s sparse fossil record alone cannot reveal our species’ evolutionary history.
Infographic: Anatomical Construction by Cell Collectives
Michael Levin | Sep 1, 2020
Understanding this complex and still largely enigmatic process will pave the way for researchers to control the development of new morphologies.
How Groups of Cells Cooperate to Build Organs and Organisms
Michael Levin | Sep 1, 2020
Understanding biology’s software—the rules that enable great plasticity in how cell collectives generate reliable anatomies—is key to advancing tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
Infographic: Dialing Down the Glitz
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Sep 1, 2020
The gene BCO2 enables male and female members of some bird species to display dramatically different color patterns.
The Peopling of South America
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2020
While questions still outnumber answers, new findings from archaeology, genetics, and other disciplines are revealing surprising insights into the early cultures of the most recently populated continent.
The Gene that Makes Female Birds Drab
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Sep 1, 2020
In some finch species, the difference between colorful males and muted females comes down to one gene, BCO2, which encodes an enzyme that degrades carotenoids.
New RNA-Based Tool Could Assess Preeclampsia Risk
Amanda Heidt | Sep 1, 2020
Transcripts circulating in the blood provide real-time information about maternal, fetal, and placental health.
Study Tracks Geographical Gene Flow and Ancestry in the US
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2020
The analysis adds new details to the picture of migration and mixing in a diverse country.
Infographic: Meet Your Ancient Ancestors and Relatives in Africa
Katarina Zimmer | Sep 1, 2020
Modern human genomes and bones left behind from ancient hominins in Africa tell a complex story about the origins of our species.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Sep 1, 2020
Meet some of the people featured in the September 2020 issue of The Scientist.
Infographic: South America’s Early Prehistory
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2020
Genetics and archaeology yield clues as to when humans first arrived on the continent and how these early settlers lived.
COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, coronavirus, pandemic, transmission, superspread, genome, virus, tracking, Biogen, Massachusetts
Thousands of Coronavirus Infections Stemmed from a Biotech Event
Amanda Heidt | Aug 26, 2020
Officials had initially linked 97 cases to a single conference held by Biogen in February in Boston, but a new study tracking viral genomes suggests the number may be as high as 20,000.
750 Million GM Mosquitoes Will Be Released in the Florida Keys
Lisa Winter | Aug 21, 2020
There have been no reports of health or environmental harm in other locations where genetically modified mosquitoes have been introduced over the last decade.
DNA Could Thwart Trade of the World’s Most Trafficked Mammal
Diana Kwon | Aug 6, 2020
Pangolins are poached for their scales and meat, leading researchers to develop a set of molecular tools to help track and mitigate the trade.
Tracking Pangolin Traffic Networks
The Scientist Staff | Aug 6, 2020
Working at bushmeat markets in Africa, researchers are trying to trace the trade networks of the mammals.
Microbial Signatures in Blood Are Associated with Various Cancers
Shawna Williams | Jul 13, 2020
A study suggests the potential for a noninvasive diagnostic that could detect tumors early and differentiate between disease types.
Male Flies’ Y Chromosome May Contribute to Earlier Deaths
Jef Akst | Jul 13, 2020
As male Drosophila grow old, selfish genetic elements that are abundant on the Y chromosome become more active, which appears to reduce longevity.
Native Americans Crossed the Pacific Long Before Europeans
Abby Olena | Jul 8, 2020
Genetic evidence points to individuals from South America having possibly floated on a raft to Polynesian islands about 500 years before Europeans navigated there.