cigarette smoking, genetics & genomics, ecology, immunology
Deadly Bat Fungus Nailed Down
Bob Grant | Oct 26, 2011
Scientists have made a definitive link between a recently-discovered fungus and a lethal disease wiping out bat populations in eastern North America.
Mom's Blood Reveals Baby's Down Syndrome
Jef Akst | Oct 25, 2011
Last week researchers released the first non-invasive prenatal test for Down syndrome, and more such tests are expected in the coming months.
Orangutans Have Culture
Bob Grant | Oct 25, 2011
A study shows that different populations of the Southeast Asian ape display and transmit specific behaviors through generations in a way similar to human cultures.
Bird Flu Vax Spurs Virus Evolution
Edyta Zielinska | Oct 21, 2011
Inadequate poultry immunization programs may cause higher mutations rates in the bird flu virus, rendering the vaccine ineffective and increasing the threat of cross-species transmission.
Climate-Shaped Arabidopsis Genome
Kerry Grens | Oct 6, 2011
Two genome-wide studies, backed up by field experiments, identify SNPs that correlate with Arabidopsis fitness in various climates.
A Mouse Model of Autism?
Tia Ghose | Oct 3, 2011
Deletions or duplications of a certain genomic region implicated in autism can induce autism-like brain and behavior changes in mice.
Immunologists Take Home Nobel
Rachel Nuwer | Oct 3, 2011
The Nobel Assembly announced today that three researchers in the field of immunology will share the 2011 Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
Three Share 2011 Medicine Nobel
Rachel Nuwer | Oct 3, 2011
The Nobel Assembly reveals three winners of this year's prize in Physiology of Medicine.
Omics
Stephen Friend, Megan Scudellari | Oct 1, 2011
Early sequencing evolved into the publication of genomes for myriad species, including our own, within the span of two and a half decades. Bioinformatician Stephen Friend opines on what's in store as the next quarter century of omics takes shape.
Opinion: Synthesizing Life
J. Craig Venter | Oct 1, 2011
Designing genomes from scratch will be the next revolution in biology.