circadian clocks, culture
Infographic: Circadian Clock Affects Health and Disease
Infographic: Circadian Clock Affects Health and Disease
Jyoti Madhusoodanan | Mar 31, 2017
The body's rhythms could affect numerous ailments as well as how people respond to treatments.
Glia Help Regulate Circadian Behaviors
Glia Help Regulate Circadian Behaviors
Diana Kwon | Mar 23, 2017
Scientists confirm that astrocytes are involved in regulating molecular and behavioral circadian rhythms in mice. 
San People Write Ethical Code for Research
San People Write Ethical Code for Research
Jef Akst | Mar 21, 2017
With lifestyles similar to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.
Singing Through Tone Deafness
Singing Through Tone Deafness
The Scientist Staff | Mar 16, 2017
Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.
How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine
How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine
Tim Falconer | Mar 1, 2017
One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia
Rhythm Arises from Random Beats in a “Telephone” Game
Rhythm Arises from Random Beats in a “Telephone” Game
Diana Kwon | Mar 1, 2017
An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.
Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?
Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?
Diana Kwon | Mar 1, 2017
Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.
Notable Science Quotes
Notable Science Quotes
The Scientist Staff | Mar 1, 2017
Music, the future of American science, and more
An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock
An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock
Anna Azvolinsky | Feb 21, 2017
Stress-related genes may be preferentially and rhythmically expressed as part of the circadian rhythms of older fruit flies, researchers report.  
Cannibalism: Not That Weird
Cannibalism: Not That Weird
Bill Schutt | Feb 1, 2017
Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.