black-and-white brain scan showing tumor
Glioblastoma Cells Imitate Immature Neurons to Invade the Brain
Neuron-like glioblastoma cells are the pioneers of deadly tumors’ spread through the brain, contributing to their devastating invasiveness, a study in mice finds.
Glioblastoma Cells Imitate Immature Neurons to Invade the Brain
Glioblastoma Cells Imitate Immature Neurons to Invade the Brain

Neuron-like glioblastoma cells are the pioneers of deadly tumors’ spread through the brain, contributing to their devastating invasiveness, a study in mice finds.

Neuron-like glioblastoma cells are the pioneers of deadly tumors’ spread through the brain, contributing to their devastating invasiveness, a study in mice finds.

cloud formation, developmental biology, cell & molecular biology, neuroscience
smiling woman with hands on hips with blackboard in background
In Deep Water With Gül Dölen
Peter Hess, Spectrum | Aug 4, 2022
A researcher’s existential crisis led to a scientific breakthrough.
old dog smiles at camera
Inside the Brains of Aging Dogs
Lesley Evans Ogden, Knowable Magazine | Aug 1, 2022
In a citizen science project, thousands of pet dogs are helping scientists to understand what happens to memory and cognition in old age.
Motor neurons, undergoing degeneration in ALS
Mutant T Cells That Drive Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Progression May React To a Brain Antigen
Nele Haelterman, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Scientists discovered a possibly autoreactive T cell population that forecasts and supports disease progression.
Infographic showing how neurodegenerative diseases have long been associated with aggregations of apparently toxic proteins
Infographic: Secret Lives of Neurodegeneration-Linked Proteins
Catherine Offord | Aug 1, 2022
Maligned peptides such as the Alzheimer’s-associated amyloid precursor protein may have critical roles in the healthy brain.
Amyloid plaques on axons of neurons
The Misunderstood Proteins of Neurodegeneration
Catherine Offord | Aug 1, 2022
The normal functions of peptides that aggregate in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s have been largely overlooked by scientists, but some argue that they are critical for understanding the development of disease.
The balance of mind and body on a seesaw
Psychological Stress Distracts the Immune System from Fighting Infections
Jennifer Zieba, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Acute stress makes immune cells migrate immediately to the bone marrow, which prepares the body for injury at the expense of increasing infectious disease susceptibility.
A dolphin comes out of the water to catch a red ball.<br><br>
Dolphins May Remember Personal Experiences
Alejandra Manjarrez | Jul 29, 2022
Bottlenose dolphins can recall trivial details of a prior event to later solve a novel task, a study finds, suggesting these mammals are capable of episodic memory.
Microscopy image of a cricket embryo, illuminated in green, pinched near one end, with one side full of bright green dots representing cell nuclei
How Wandering Nuclei Shape Developing Embryos
Viviane Callier | Jul 29, 2022
As cricket blastoderms form, cell nuclei are pulled into an egg’s remaining empty space to form the new cell layers that will shape the developing animal.
&nbsp;somite organoid in culture
Reconstructing How the Spine Takes its Shape
Nele Haelterman, PhD | Aug 5, 2022
Marina Sanaki-Matsumiya figured out how to grow human somites in a dish through a process that mirrors the tissue’s development in the embryo.
Fluorescent cells in culture connected by tunneling nanotubules
SARS-CoV-2 Could Use Nanotubes to Infect the Brain
Natalia Mesa | Jul 21, 2022
Stressed cells can form hollow actin bridges to neighbors to get help, but the virus may hijack these tiny tunnels for its own purposes, a study suggests.
Illustration of brain activity
Same Parts of the Brain Control Processing of Dozens of Languages
Andy Carstens | Jul 21, 2022
While much is known about how the brains of English speakers process language, research has neglected people who speak other languages. The Scientist spoke with one of the authors of a study that seeks to change that.
A Rising Star Launches Brain Power into Outer Space
Science Philosophy in a Flash - A Rising Star Launches Brain Power into Outer Space
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | Jul 27, 2022
Alysson Muotri shares how tapping into his inner creative spark fuels his pursuit of science.
illustration of brain with DNA strand coming out the top
Genetic Underpinnings of Brain Activity May Differ in Autism
Emily Harris | Jul 19, 2022
A study finds that expression levels of certain genes that track with brain activity—particularly those involved in brain development—vary between people with autism and their non-autistic peers.
gray mouse drinking from water bottle in cage
“Feel-Good” Neurons Steer Mice Toward Hydration-Boosting Liquids
Shafaq Zia | Jul 19, 2022
The cells signal to the brain how hydrating particular beverages are, but it’s not yet clear whether they play a similar role in humans.
Raising the Bar for Biomarkers and Early Diagnostics in Neurodegenerative Disease
Raising the Bar for Biomarkers and Early Diagnostics in Neurodegenerative Disease
Fortis Life Sciences | Jun 20, 2022
Identifying novel biomarkers of Parkinson’s disease enables early diagnosis and treatment monitoring.
multiple generations of family members eating at outdoor table
Sun Exposure Triggers Hunger in Men but Not Women, Study Suggests
Shafaq Zia | Jul 12, 2022
Ultraviolet radiation leads to secretion of an appetite-boosting hormone in male mice, but experts say it’s not yet clear whether the mechanism applies to humans.
Brain imaging of a fruit fly
Science Snapshot: When Pregnant Flies Crave Ice Cream and Pickles
Lisa Winter | Jul 7, 2022
A visualization technique shows how fruit flies choose which food to eat.
Harnessing Stem Cells to Treat Disease
Harnessing Stem Cells to Treat Disease
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jun 3, 2022
In this webinar, Kim Vanuytsel and Ryan Flannigan will discuss cutting-edge technologies for improving stem cell-based therapies.
Colin Blakemore
Neuroscientist Colin Blakemore Dies at 78
Lisa Winter | Jul 6, 2022
The prolific science communicator specialized in studies of vision and brain plasticity and was the focus of threats from animal rights extremists for several years.