The brain's cerebellum
The Cerebellum’s Functions in Cognition, Emotion, and More
Once thought of as a mere motor coordination center, the “little brain” is now appreciated as participating in higher neurological processes.
The Cerebellum’s Functions in Cognition, Emotion, and More
The Cerebellum’s Functions in Cognition, Emotion, and More

Once thought of as a mere motor coordination center, the “little brain” is now appreciated as participating in higher neurological processes.

Once thought of as a mere motor coordination center, the “little brain” is now appreciated as participating in higher neurological processes.

controversy, developmental biology
Microscopy image of a cricket embryo, illuminated in green, pinched near one end, with one side full of bright green dots representing cell nuclei
How Wandering Nuclei Shape Developing Embryos
Viviane Callier | Jul 29, 2022
As cricket blastoderms form, cell nuclei are pulled into an egg’s remaining empty space to form the new cell layers that will shape the developing animal.
Person in a black, beaked robe (left) and man in a black tunic (right), flanking a red coat of arms
Masking Up, 1619 to present
Devin A. Reese | Jul 5, 2022
Putting on a mask to protect oneself and others against disease is nothing new, nor is resistance to mask-wearing, but mask designs have changed considerably from their first iterations.
A Brief History of Stem Cells
Scientific Breakthroughs with Stem Cells
Nele Haelterman, PhD
Discover the various ways scientists bolster stem cells to understand and cure disease.
3D objects of Ebola Viruses in abstract plasma
Notable Science Quotes
The Scientist Staff | May 31, 2022
Cracking the mystery of fungal infections in India, the Sabatini controversy, addressing Ebola, and more
Photo of Junyue Cao
Junyue Cao Applies Novel Approaches to Aging and Disease
Lisa Winter | Mar 14, 2022
The Rockefeller University geneticist is tracing the full lifespan of individual cells to better understand how and why humans age.
 somite organoid in culture
Reconstructing How the Spine Takes its Shape
Nele Haelterman, PhD
Marina Sanaki-Matsumiya figured out how to grow human somites in a dish through a process that mirrors the tissue’s development in the embryo.
EXCLUSIVE
Stethoscope on top of form and clipboard
Robert Malone Targets Physician Who Alerted Medical Board to Misinformation
Catherine Offord | Feb 19, 2022
A Hawaii hospital worker who reported the controversial scientist to the Maryland Board of Physicians was subjected to harassment and a retaliatory complaint after Malone made his name and location public.
Image of an abstract fractal blue and green sea shell.
Cell Chirality Offers Clues to the Mystery of Body Asymmetry
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022
Researchers explore the idea that molecular patterns in individual cells could underlie the development of a left and a right in animals.
Harnessing Stem Cells to Treat Disease
Harnessing Stem Cells to Treat Disease
The Scientist Creative Services Team
In this webinar, Kim Vanuytsel and Ryan Flannigan will discuss cutting-edge technologies for improving stem cell-based therapies.
Illustration of fibers in a cell twisting
Infographic: The Emergence of Chirality in the Cell Cytoskeleton
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022
Researchers use imaging to show how actin fibers tilt and then swirl to create left-right asymmetry in the cell.
Photo of older woman dressed in blue smiling and looking at the camera
Cancer Researcher Beatrice Mintz Dies at 100
Natalia Mesa | Jan 20, 2022
Mintz’s experiments over her six-decade career were foundational to cancer and genetics research.
istock
How to Grow a Mouse Embryo in a Dish
Roni Dengler, PhD
Researchers are taking the concept of three-dimensional cell culture beyond single organoids to develop embryos from cells.
Multiple purple and pink renditions of stem cells appear as spherical clusters enveloped in translucent bubbles
Mammalian Embryos Might Not Need Primitive Streaks After All
Dan Robitzski | Dec 2, 2021
The primitive streak, a structure that emerges during mammalian and avian gastrulation, might be a byproduct rather than a landmark of the embryonic development process.
Man in a white shirt and a large backpack stands on a hill overlooking dense forest
Public Health Pioneer Peter Pharoah Dies at 87
Dan Robitzski | Nov 11, 2021
Pharoah’s work ended endemic cretinism in a remote region of Papua New Guinea and contributed to the understanding of myriad other perinatal health conditions.
Sample Preparation with Single Cell Multiomics: Simultaneous Epigenomic and Transcriptomic Profiling from the Same Cell
The Scientist Creative Services Team
In this webinar brought to you by 10x Genomics, experts will discuss how to successfully prepare nuclei suspensions for Single Cell Multiome ATAC + Gene Expression experiments.
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Emily Cox and Henry Rathvon | Aug 1, 2021
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
Infographic: Maternal Microbiota Has Lasting Effects on Offspring
Carolyn A. Thomson and Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Work in rodents shows that the bacteria living in a mother’s gut can produce immunomodulatory metabolites and influence the production of maternal antibodies—both of which can affect her offspring’s development.
Getting Started with Single Cell Multiomics: Simultaneous Epigenomic and Transcriptomic Profiling from the Same Cell
The Scientist Creative Services Team
In this webinar brought to you by 10x Genomics, experts will discuss tips for running Chromium Single Cell Multiome ATAC + Gene Expression experiments in your lab.
The Role of Mom’s Microbes During Pregnancy
Carolyn A. Thomson and Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Bacteria in the gut influence the production of antibodies and themselves secrete metabolites. In a pregnant woman, these compounds may influence immune development of her fetus.