crow, genetics & genomics, culture, neuroscience
. . . And Many Happy Returns
Mary Beth Aberlin | Oct 1, 2011
To the great scientific leaps witnessed during our first 25 years, and the game changers yet to come.
Opinion: Evolving Engineering
George M. Church | Oct 1, 2011
Exploiting the unique properties of living systems makes synthetic biologists better engineers.
Evolution, Tout de Suite
Richard P. Grant | Oct 1, 2011
Epigenetic perturbations could jump-start heritable variation.
Opinion: Research and Debt Reduction
Mary Woolley | Oct 1, 2011
Investing more federal dollars in life science research may save the US economy.
Double Blind
Cristina Luiggi | Oct 1, 2011
The mother of disabled twins doggedly pursued the root of her children's illness and found it in their genome profiles.
A Not-So-Short Circuit?
Edyta Zielinska | Oct 1, 2011
As neuroscientists look to the future of their field, they are beginning to delve into more complex factors that define our emotions and intentions.
Opinion: Thinking Outside the Genome
Stephen Friend | Oct 1, 2011
By extending its reach beyond science, the field of omics will change the way we live our lives.
The Human Genome Project, Then and Now
Walter F. Bodmer | Oct 1, 2011
An early advocate of the sequencing of the human genome reflects on his own predictions from 1986.
Book Excerpt from Future Science: Essays From the Cutting Edge
William McEwan | Oct 1, 2011
In an essay entitled "Molecular Cut and Paste: The New Generation of Biological Tools," virologist William McEwan envisions a future where viruses are reprogrammed to become the workhorses of science and medicine.
The Scientist, Inaugural Issue, 1986
Jef Akst | Oct 1, 2011
Twenty-five years later, the magazine is still hitting many of the same key discussion points of science.