culture, cell & molecular biology, immunology, neuroscience, microbiology, disease & medicine
Infographic: Caveolae Form and Function
Infographic: Caveolae Form and Function
Ben Nichols | Jun 1, 2018
Researchers interrogate the cavernous structures on the surface of cells to better understand how they affect membrane function.
Infographic: Researchers Aim to Predict How Pathogens Jump Species
Infographic: Researchers Aim to Predict How Pathogens Jump Species
Ashley Yeager | Jun 1, 2018

Understanding the factors that influence spillover could help forecast future epidemics.

 

Infographic: Can Archaea Teach Us About the Evolution of Eukaroyotes?
Infographic: Can Archaea Teach Us About the Evolution of Eukaroyotes?
Amber Dance | Jun 1, 2018
The discovery of copious new archaeal species is shedding light on the tree of life and revealing some unique cellular biology.
Infographic: Gassy Genes
Infographic: Gassy Genes
Ruth Williams | Jun 1, 2018

Soil scientists get bacteria to report on what their neighbors are up to.

Contributors
Contributors
Jim Daley | Jun 1, 2018
Meet some of the people featured in the June 2018 issue of The Scientist.
From Little Things Big Things Grow
From Little Things Big Things Grow
Bob Grant | Jun 1, 2018
We should take comfort in the fact that life on Earth had such unassuming, shared beginnings.
Ten-Minute Sabbatical
Ten-Minute Sabbatical
The Scientist Staff | Jun 1, 2018
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
Why Bats Make Such Good Viral Hosts
Why Bats Make Such Good Viral Hosts
Katarina Zimmer | Jun 1, 2018
The bat version of the STING protein helps dampen the mammals' immune response to infection, researchers have found.
Predicting Future Zoonotic Disease Outbreaks
Predicting Future Zoonotic Disease Outbreaks
Ashley Yeager | Jun 1, 2018
A step-by-step study of diseases that jump species gives subtle clues about future epidemics.
New Technologies Shed Light on Caveolae
New Technologies Shed Light on Caveolae
Ben Nichols | Jun 1, 2018
The functions of the cellular invaginations identified more than half a century ago are now beginning to be understood in detail.