A microscopy image of a mouse brain that shows the lymphatic system in bright purple and pink
Brain’s Lymphatic System Tied to Alzheimer’s Symptoms in Mice
A dysfunctional lymphatic system, described as a clogging of the brain’s sink, may explain why immunotherapies fail in some Alzheimer’s patients.
Brain’s Lymphatic System Tied to Alzheimer’s Symptoms in Mice
Brain’s Lymphatic System Tied to Alzheimer’s Symptoms in Mice

A dysfunctional lymphatic system, described as a clogging of the brain’s sink, may explain why immunotherapies fail in some Alzheimer’s patients.

A dysfunctional lymphatic system, described as a clogging of the brain’s sink, may explain why immunotherapies fail in some Alzheimer’s patients.

DEET, neuroscience
Can Single Cells Learn?
Catherine Offord | May 1, 2021
A controversial idea from the mid-20th century is attracting renewed attention from researchers developing theories for how cognition arises with or without a brain.
Infographic: Investigating Whether Single Cells Learn
Catherine Offord | May 1, 2021
Historical and modern experiments have hinted that unicelluar organisms can learn from their experiences, but the idea still has its critics.
illustration of different cells types in retina
Cones Derived from Human Stem Cells Help Mice See: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Apr 23, 2021
Researchers insert functioning cone photoreceptors into the retinas of mice with advanced eye disease, improving their vision.
Dietary Spermidine Boosts Cognition in Insects and Rodents
Ruth Williams | Apr 15, 2021
Mice and flies given the polyamine in their diet have increased brain cell metabolism and cognitive function, and epidemiological data hints at a similar benefit in humans.
ethics, bioethics, brain organoid, chimera, cell transplant, Q&A, report, NIH, NAS, neuroscience, Techniques, disease & medicine, immunology, psychiatric conditions
New Report Dissects Ethics of Emerging Human Brain Cell Models
Amanda Heidt | Apr 12, 2021
The National Academies’ report touches on ethical issues raised by new technologies such as brain organoids and human-animal chimeras, and suggests that current regulatory oversight is sufficient.
eeg covid-19 seizures neurologic symptoms epileptiform coronavirus pandemic sars-cov-2
Seizures Common in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients
Emma Yasinski | Apr 12, 2021
The death rate was higher among those who experienced the seizures, according to a study conducted during the early days of the pandemic.
Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern
Abby Olena | Apr 8, 2021
Impressions that ancient brains left in fossilized skulls reveal that the first human ancestors to migrate out of Africa had much more primitive brains than previously thought.
Anesthesia Impairs Memory in Mice
Abby Olena | Apr 1, 2021
A study that compared several anesthetic regimens in rodents showed that only one—inhaled isoflurane—wasn’t detrimental to the activity of neurons in the hippocampus.
Contributors
Asher Jones, Kerry Grens | Apr 1, 2021
Meet some of the people featured in the April 2021 issue of The Scientist.
What a Video Game Can Reveal About Monkeys’ Minds
Shawna Williams | Apr 1, 2021
Researchers find that the animals can account for others’ behavior and circumstances in their strategies.
GWAS, psychotic disorder, mood disorder, Q&A, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression, sex differences
Genetic Variants Tied to Sex Differences in Psychiatric Disorders
Amanda Heidt | Mar 31, 2021
The largest study of its kind identifies single nucleotide polymorphisms with disparate effects on men’s and women’s susceptibility to conditions such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
Mary Jeanne Kreek, heroin, addiction, methadone, drug addiction, The Rockefeller University,
Mary Jeanne Kreek, Methadone Developer, Dies at 84
Asher Jones | Mar 31, 2021
A physician and neurobiologist at the Rockefeller University who specialized in addiction research, Kreek was best known for her work on developing the treatment for heroin addiction.
alcohol acetate cerebellum aldh2 dehydrogenase liver metabolism
Cerebellum Plays Crucial Role in Metabolizing Alcohol in Mice
Marcus A. Banks | Mar 31, 2021
The researchers say these findings challenge dogma in the field, which has given the liver all credit for metabolizing alcohol.
Early Training Forestalls Motor, Memory Difficulties in Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome
Laura Dattaro | Mar 29, 2021
Manipulating the activity of neurons active during training had similar effects on the mice’s behavior.
rugby, concussion, brain injury, concussion, trauma, saliva, spit, test, noninvasive, diagnostic, microRNA, small noncoding RNA, PCR, RNA
Simple Spit Test Could Diagnose Concussions
Asher Jones | Mar 24, 2021
A noninvasive saliva test accurately identified concussions in a study of hundreds of rugby players.
Flexible Synapse Strength May Underpin Mammal Brain’s Complexity
Asher Jones | Mar 24, 2021
Neural connections in the mouse neocortex can release multiple packages of neurotransmitters per electrical impulse, a study finds.
Infographic: A New Model of Synapse Strength
Asher Jones | Mar 24, 2021
Synapses in the mouse neocortex can release multiple packages of neurotransmitters, suggesting that connection strength is more flexible than previously thought.
neurological disorder, brain disease, Q&A, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, motor neuron disease, neurodegeneration, blood-brain barrier, sex
Sex of Human Cells Matters in Studying Neurological Disease
Amanda Heidt | Mar 18, 2021
Authors of a new review urge researchers to consider how the chromosomal sex of a cell affects experiments in research on neurodegeneration.
early-life stress, histone, chromatin, epigenetics, epigenetic modification, methylation, DNA, protein, stress, adversity, mice, genetics, genomics
Early-Life Stress Exerts Long-Lasting Effects Via Epigenome
Asher Jones | Mar 18, 2021
In mice, epigenetic marks made on histones during infancy influence depression-like behavior during adulthood. A drug that reverses the genomic tags appears to undo the damage.