Photo of Junyue Cao
Junyue Cao Applies Novel Approaches to Aging and Disease
The Rockefeller University geneticist is tracing the full lifespan of individual cells to better understand how and why humans age.
ABOVE: Matthew Septimus, The Rockefeller University
Junyue Cao Applies Novel Approaches to Aging and Disease
Junyue Cao Applies Novel Approaches to Aging and Disease

The Rockefeller University geneticist is tracing the full lifespan of individual cells to better understand how and why humans age.

The Rockefeller University geneticist is tracing the full lifespan of individual cells to better understand how and why humans age.

ABOVE: Matthew Septimus, The Rockefeller University

developmental biology

Image of an abstract fractal blue and green sea shell.
Cell Chirality Offers Clues to the Mystery of Body Asymmetry
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022
Researchers explore the idea that molecular patterns in individual cells could underlie the development of a left and a right in animals.
Illustration of fibers in a cell twisting
Infographic: The Emergence of Chirality in the Cell Cytoskeleton
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022
Researchers use imaging to show how actin fibers tilt and then swirl to create left-right asymmetry in the cell.
istock
How to Grow a Mouse Embryo in a Dish
Roni Dengler, PhD | Aug 3, 2021
Researchers are taking the concept of three-dimensional cell culture beyond single organoids to develop embryos from cells.
Photo of older woman dressed in blue smiling and looking at the camera
Cancer Researcher Beatrice Mintz Dies at 100
Natalia Mesa | Jan 20, 2022
Mintz’s experiments over her six-decade career were foundational to cancer and genetics research.
Multiple purple and pink renditions of stem cells appear as spherical clusters enveloped in translucent bubbles
Mammalian Embryos Might Not Need Primitive Streaks After All
Dan Robitzski | Dec 2, 2021
The primitive streak, a structure that emerges during mammalian and avian gastrulation, might be a byproduct rather than a landmark of the embryonic development process.
Sample Preparation with Single Cell Multiomics: Simultaneous Epigenomic and Transcriptomic Profiling from the Same Cell
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Sep 30, 2020
In this webinar brought to you by 10x Genomics, experts will discuss how to successfully prepare nuclei suspensions for Single Cell Multiome ATAC + Gene Expression experiments.
Man in a white shirt and a large backpack stands on a hill overlooking dense forest
Public Health Pioneer Peter Pharoah Dies at 87
Dan Robitzski | Nov 11, 2021
Pharoah’s work ended endemic cretinism in a remote region of Papua New Guinea and contributed to the understanding of myriad other perinatal health conditions.
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Emily Cox and Henry Rathvon | Aug 1, 2021
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
Getting Started with Single Cell Multiomics: Simultaneous Epigenomic and Transcriptomic Profiling from the Same Cell
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Sep 15, 2020
In this webinar brought to you by 10x Genomics, experts will discuss tips for running Chromium Single Cell Multiome ATAC + Gene Expression experiments in your lab.
Infographic: Maternal Microbiota Has Lasting Effects on Offspring
Carolyn A. Thomson, Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Work in rodents shows that the bacteria living in a mother’s gut can produce immunomodulatory metabolites and influence the production of maternal antibodies—both of which can affect her offspring’s development.
The Role of Mom’s Microbes During Pregnancy
Carolyn A. Thomson, Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Bacteria in the gut influence the production of antibodies and themselves secrete metabolites. In a pregnant woman, these compounds may influence immune development of her fetus.
Photo of newborn mouse pups
Retinal Activity Prepares Blind Newborn Mice for Vision
Ruth Williams | Jul 22, 2021
Spontaneous waves of nerve impulses flowing across the retina help mouse pups practice motion detection for when they eventually open their eyes.
A scanning electron micrograph of a fetal gut, pseudocolored in yellow and blue
Microbes in Human Fetuses Spur Immune Development
Abby Olena | Jun 3, 2021
Researchers identify live bacteria in fetal guts, skin, lungs, and placentas that activate memory T cells, indicating that early exposure to microbes could help educate the developing immune system.
Hippocampal neurons are labeled in blue and purple on a black background
New Role for Leptin: Promoting Synapse Formation in Rat Neurons
Abby Olena | May 20, 2021
The hormone, which is well known for regulating appetite, appears to influence neuronal development—a finding that could shed light on disorders such as autism that involve dysfunctional synapse formation.
Human-Monkey Chimeras Shed Light on Development
Abby Olena | Apr 15, 2021
Human stem cells injected into early monkey embryos proliferate and contribute to multiple cell lineages over 20 days of embryonic development.
Lab-Grown Mouse Embryos Form Limbs and Organs
Lisa Winter | Mar 19, 2021
The embryos completed one-third of their total gestation outside of a uterus.
Human Blastocyst-Like Structures Made in the Lab
Abby Olena | Mar 17, 2021
Two new papers describe the generation of so-called blastoids, which could avoid the use of embryonic cells and make studying early human development much more accessible.
lewis wolpert obituary developmental biology embryo 14 day rule
High Profile Developmental Biologist Lewis Wolpert Dies at 91
Shawna Williams | Feb 16, 2021
Wolpert, who conducted research at University College London, was known for his work on morphogenesis and pattern development in embryos and for his multiple books and broadcast appearances.
A Simple Genetic Change Adds Limb-Like Bones to Zebrafish Fins
Abby Olena | Feb 5, 2021
A gain-of-function mutation in a single gene reveals ancient limb-forming capacity that has been preserved for hundreds of millions of years.