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Photo of Claudia Gerri
Claudia Gerri Studies the Mysteries of the Placenta
At the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, the developmental biologist is probing the maternal-fetal interface across mammalian species.
Claudia Gerri Studies the Mysteries of the Placenta
Claudia Gerri Studies the Mysteries of the Placenta

At the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, the developmental biologist is probing the maternal-fetal interface across mammalian species.

At the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, the developmental biologist is probing the maternal-fetal interface across mammalian species.

developmental biology
a human neuron illuminated in bright green on a black background.
Mitochondrial Metabolism Dictates Neurons’ Growth Rate
Katherine Irving | Jan 30, 2023 | 4 min read
Altering the rate of respiration in mitochondria changes how fast neurons grow, making mouse neurons grow more like human ones and vice versa, a study finds.
Collage of faces
Remembering Those We Lost in 2022
Lisa Winter | Dec 26, 2022 | 5 min read
A look at some noteworthy scientists who died this year, leaving behind a legacy of research excellence.
Key Strategies for Better Stem Cell Workflows
Solutions for Optimizing Stem Cell Therapy Development
Sartorius | 1 min read
Discover how process knowledge is integral to stem cell workflow improvement and optimization.
A colored microscopy image showing cells that are dying in yellow and healthy cells in blue 
Sweet Taste Receptors Regulate Proteins in Developing Fruit Flies
Tess Joosse | Nov 14, 2022 | 2 min read
An unexpected find shows that sweet-sensing receptors also help epithelial cells in Drosophila larvae stay alive amid proteotoxic stress.
Embryonic gecko hand
Science Snapshot: Show of Hands
Lisa Winter | Oct 28, 2022 | 1 min read
This image took the top prize at the 2022 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition.
A Brief History of Stem Cells
Scientific Breakthroughs with Stem Cells
Nele Haelterman, PhD | 1 min read
Discover the various ways scientists bolster stem cells to understand and cure disease.
A composite headshot of Camila Behrensen (left) and Pablo Guzmán Palma (right)
Two Allegedly Murdered Scientists Found in Apartment Fire
Amanda Heidt | Oct 5, 2022 | 2 min read
Emergency responders arrived at a structure fire in Kansas City to find the two graduate students suffering from “apparent trauma” before they were declared dead at the scene.
Fluorescent view of a zebrafish embryo
Science Snapshot: Do the Locomotion
Lisa Winter | Sep 29, 2022 | 1 min read
The top winner of the 2022 Nikon Small World in Motion contest shows cells migrating through a zebrafish embryo.
 somite organoid in culture
Reconstructing How the Spine Takes its Shape
Nele Haelterman, PhD | 3 min read
Marina Sanaki-Matsumiya figured out how to grow human somites in a dish through a process that mirrors the tissue’s development in the embryo.
The brain's cerebellum
The Cerebellum’s Functions in Cognition, Emotion, and More
Diana Kwon | Aug 15, 2022 | 10+ min read
Once thought of as a mere motor coordination center, the “little brain” is now appreciated as participating in higher neurological processes.
Microscopy image of a cricket embryo, illuminated in green, pinched near one end, with one side full of bright green dots representing cell nuclei
How Wandering Nuclei Shape Developing Embryos
Viviane Callier | Jul 29, 2022 | 3 min read
As cricket blastoderms form, cell nuclei are pulled into an egg’s remaining empty space to form the new cell layers that will shape the developing animal.
Harnessing Stem Cells to Treat Disease
Harnessing Stem Cells to Treat Disease
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
In this webinar, Kim Vanuytsel and Ryan Flannigan will discuss cutting-edge technologies for improving stem cell-based therapies.
Photo of Junyue Cao
Junyue Cao Applies Novel Approaches to Aging and Disease
Lisa Winter | Mar 14, 2022 | 3 min read
The Rockefeller University geneticist is tracing the full lifespan of individual cells to better understand how and why humans age.
Image of an abstract fractal blue and green sea shell.
Cell Chirality Offers Clues to the Mystery of Body Asymmetry
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022 | 10+ min read
Researchers explore the idea that molecular patterns in individual cells could underlie the development of a left and a right in animals.
istock
How to Grow a Mouse Embryo in a Dish
Roni Dengler, PhD | 3 min read
Researchers are taking the concept of three-dimensional cell culture beyond single organoids to develop embryos from cells.
Illustration of fibers in a cell twisting
Infographic: The Emergence of Chirality in the Cell Cytoskeleton
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022 | 1 min read
Researchers use imaging to show how actin fibers tilt and then swirl to create left-right asymmetry in the cell.
Photo of older woman dressed in blue smiling and looking at the camera
Cancer Researcher Beatrice Mintz Dies at 100
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 20, 2022 | 2 min read
Mintz’s experiments over her six-decade career were foundational to cancer and genetics research.
Sample Preparation with Single Cell Multiomics: Simultaneous Epigenomic and Transcriptomic Profiling from the Same Cell
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
In this webinar brought to you by 10x Genomics, experts will discuss how to successfully prepare nuclei suspensions for Single Cell Multiome ATAC + Gene Expression experiments.
Multiple purple and pink renditions of stem cells appear as spherical clusters enveloped in translucent bubbles
Mammalian Embryos Might Not Need Primitive Streaks After All
Dan Robitzski | Dec 2, 2021 | 7 min read
The primitive streak, a structure that emerges during mammalian and avian gastrulation, might be a byproduct rather than a landmark of the embryonic development process.
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