Bespectacled man wearing black shirt with arms folded looks at camera in front of lab cabinet
Neuropathologist John Trojanowski Dies at 75
His work was pivotal to understanding the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.
ABOVE: University of Pennsylvania
Neuropathologist John Trojanowski Dies at 75
Neuropathologist John Trojanowski Dies at 75

His work was pivotal to understanding the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

His work was pivotal to understanding the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

ABOVE: University of Pennsylvania

disease & medicine

Man with white hair sits in front of a world map
Famed Pathologist Johan Hultin Dies at 97
Lisa Winter | Mar 2, 2022
Hultin’s work helped identify the virus behind the 1918 flu pandemic.
Black and white photograph of Stamler looking into the camera.
“Father of Preventive Cardiology” Jeremiah Stamler Dies at 102
Lisa Winter | Feb 18, 2022
He was among the first to identify lifestyle factors that contribute to cardiovascular disease.
How Infectious Diseases Affect the Brain
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 8, 2021
From a loss of taste to dementia, infectious agents cause an array of neurological symptoms.
Blue T cell with other blurred T cells in the background
Woman Seemingly Cured of HIV After Umbilical Cord Transplant
Natalia Mesa | Feb 16, 2022
Umbilical cord blood may be a good alternative to bone marrow transplants for treating HIV in patients with HIV and cancer.
illustration of inside of human chest with highlighted gland between the lungs
Genetically Altered Mice Harness Benefits of Calorie Restriction  
Sophie Fessl | Feb 11, 2022
A study identifies a gene that appears to be partially responsible for the health effects of a limited diet.
Modeling the Human Lung with Organoids
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with MilliporeSigma | Mar 29, 2021
A new specialized cell culture media system generates induced pluripotent stem cell-derived lung organoids that more closely resemble the diversity of cell types found in the human lung.
Sign on front of a US embassy reads Embassy of the United States
Mysterious Havana Syndrome Not a Foreign Attack: CIA
Jef Akst | Jan 20, 2022
Sharing interim findings of an investigation into strange illnesses among US diplomats and intelligence officials, the CIA says it’s unlikely that they are the result of directed energy or other weapon levied by an adversary.
In one of the only known photos of Abraham Lincoln taken on the day of the Gettysburg Address, Lincoln can be seen seated, hatless, just below and to the right of the flag. Lincoln began developing symptoms of smallpox on the train home to Washington, DC.
Presidential Pox, 1863
Annie Melchor | Dec 1, 2021
Researchers continue to debate whether US President Abraham Lincoln was coming down with smallpox as he delivered his famous Gettysburg Address, and if he had been immunized.
Liver Dysfunction: Causes and Mechanisms
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Dec 21, 2020
Learn about the underlying causes and mechanisms behind liver pathophysiology.
Red blood cells are pictured in grayscale on a gray background
Red Blood Cells Activate Innate Immune System
Abby Olena | Oct 20, 2021
Researchers link the ability of the cells to bind and present DNA from pathogens and cell death to anemia, which is common in COVID-19, and immune activation.
illustration of a coronavirus and antibodies
When the Immune Response Makes COVID-19 Worse
Alejandra Manjarrez | Sep 27, 2021
If the immune system makes mistakes—reacting late or getting the target wrong—it can amplify the damage wrought by SARS-CoV-2.
Peering into the Cell
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Dec 16, 2020
Researchers visualize the beautiful inner world of cells!
Watercolor coronaviruses in green, red, blue, and purple are layered above an abstract background of watercolor swashes
Plenty of Evidence for Recombination in SARS-CoV-2
Abby Olena | Sep 2, 2021
Different variants of the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic are swapping chunks of genetic material, but it’s not yet clear what implications that may have for public health.
Illustration showing the bodily systems affected by Long COVID
Infographic: Bodily Systems Affected by Long COVID
Sruthi S. Balakrishnan | Sep 1, 2021
Symptoms documented in cases of long COVID are wide ranging and variable.
Breaking Down Barriers
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 19, 2020
Looking at the future of neurodegeneration research!
Human blood in a plastic Intravenous drip bag, the tube running out of the image. Square crop. Horizontal with copy space.
Opinion: What the History of Blood Transfusion Reveals About Risk
Paul A. Offit | Sep 1, 2021
Every medical intervention—even one with a centuries-long history—brings dangers, some of which become clear only later.
Illustration of a person sick next to a calendar indicating they've had covid for a long time
Mechanisms of Long COVID Remain Unknown but Data Are Rolling In
Sruthi S. Balakrishnan | Sep 1, 2021
A year and a half into the pandemic, the long-term effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection are garnering more research attention as millions of long COVID patients emerge.
High Content Phenotypic Screening and Analysis Enhances Drug Discovery
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 7, 2020
Molly Shoichet and Bridget Wagner discuss strategies for using phenotypic screening to identify novel agents against diseases such as cancer and diabetes.
Red blood vessels that decrease in diameter as they radiate outward are pictured on a pink and white surface
Antisense Oligonucleotides Cross Rodents’ Blood-Brain Barrier
Abby Olena | Aug 18, 2021
RNA-DNA complexes that were modified with cholesterol made it into the brains of rats and mice, where they knocked down target genes.