diseases/medicine, evolution, genetics & genomics
High-Tech Choir Master
High-Tech Choir Master
Karen Hopkin | Jan 1, 2012
Elaine Mardis can make DNA sequencers sing, generating genome data that shed light on evolution and disease.
Cat Cravings
Cat Cravings
Jef Akst | Jan 1, 2012
A mutated feline receptor for sweet tastes explains why cats don’t love sugar but do dig mushrooms.
Speaking of Science
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2012
January 2012's selection of notable quotes
Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s
Sabrina Richards | Jan 1, 2012
How Nobel Laureate Barbara McClintock nearly gave up genetics for meteorology
Anthropomorphism: A Peculiar Institution
Marlene Zuk | Jan 1, 2012
Should we rethink the parallel drawn between “slave-making” ants and human slavery, and other such oversimplifications of animal behavior?
2011's Best and Brightest
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2012
In its brief, 4-year history, The Scientist’s annual Top 10 Innovations contest has become a showcase of the coolest life science tools to emerge in the previous year. 
Magnetic Swimmers Cultured
Tia Ghose | Dec 22, 2011
For the first time, researchers culture a bacteria that uses a magnetic sulfide compound to navigate.
Video Gamers Help Solve Disease
Jef Akst | Dec 20, 2011
The collective intelligence of thousands of video game players is helping researchers understand the regulation of more than 500 different disease genes.
The Evolution of Drug Resistance
Ruth Williams | Dec 18, 2011
Researchers use whole-genome sequencing to keep tabs on the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.
Darwin Didn't Plagiarize Wallace
Bob Grant | Dec 13, 2011
19th century shipping records defy the claim that Charles Darwin stole some of Alfred Russel Wallace's ideas to craft his theory of evolution.