ecology, neuroscience, cell & molecular biology, immunology
To Pee or Not to Pee
Richard P. Grant | Sep 1, 2011
Have researchers found the seat of urination control in a primitive brain region?
Vive la Différence
H. Steven Wiley | Sep 1, 2011
Measuring how individual cells differ from each other will enhance the predictive power of biology.
Hold That Thought
Mary Beth Aberlin | Sep 1, 2011
In the memory circuits of the aging brain and the signaling pathways of pain, science is trading mystery for mastery.
The Cytokine Cycle
The Cytokine Cycle
W. Sue T. Griffin | Sep 1, 2011
The initiating cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. However, from our studies it’s clear that many types of neuronal damage—­­from traumatic brain injury, to epilepsy, infection, or genetic predisposition—­can activate brain immune cells—microglia and astrocytes-- promoting them to produce IL-1 and S100 inflammatory cytokines.
Deep Tissue Treatment
Tia Ghose | Sep 1, 2011
A new, genetically encoded tag for electron microscopy may revolutionize studies of specific proteins in cells and tissues.
Piggyback Pathogen
Jessica P. Johnson | Sep 1, 2011
Editor’s Choice in Immunology
Ribosomes in Control
Jessica P. Johnson | Sep 1, 2011
Editor’s Choice in Cell Biology
Puncturing the Myth
Geoffrey Burnstock | Sep 1, 2011
Purinergic signaling, not mystical energy, may explain how acupuncture works.
Blood’s Role in the Aging Brain
Edyta Zielinska | Aug 31, 2011
A blood protein involved in allergy contributes to the decline in brain function and memory in aging mice.
Hiding Under a Cap
Richard P. Grant | Aug 30, 2011
Editor's Choice in Immunology