How Wildfire Smoke Raises Infectious Disease Risk
How Wildfire Smoke Raises Infectious Disease Risk
Amanda Heidt | Sep 8, 2021
As fires blanket growing swathes of the West, scientists are beginning to understand more about how their smoke affects the transmission and severity of COVID-19 and other illnesses, and how it differs from that of other types of air pollution.
Researchers in Ida’s Destructive Path Brace for Disruptions
Researchers in Ida’s Destructive Path Brace for Disruptions
Amanda Heidt, Annie Melchor | Aug 30, 2021
The storm, which made landfall over the weekend as a Category 4 hurricane and has since weakened, forced the evacuation of multiple Louisiana campuses.
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Christie Wilcox | Aug 19, 2021
The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.
Global Temperatures to Top Paris Agreement Limit by 2060: Report
Global Temperatures to Top Paris Agreement Limit by 2060: Report
Annie Melchor | Aug 9, 2021
The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says some changes are already irreversible, and warns of even more dire ramifications if global carbon emissions aren’t reduced immediately.
A “Climate Catastrophe”: Western US Salmon on the Brink
A “Climate Catastrophe”: Western US Salmon on the Brink
Lisa Winter | Jul 27, 2021
A recent sampling from two California streams found nearly all juvenile salmon were infected with deadly parasites, and conditions are expected to worsen.
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Amanda Heidt | Jul 13, 2021
Microscopic creatures called epibionts that live on sea turtles’ shells can help researchers understand their secretive lives.
Mice Plague Eastern Australia in Record Numbers
Mice Plague Eastern Australia in Record Numbers
Bianca Nogrady | Jul 12, 2021
A population explosion that began late last year has yet to abate. Meanwhile, researchers are exploring novel approaches to combat the nonnative species.
Trout Appear to Get Hooked on Meth
Trout Appear to Get Hooked on Meth
Christie Wilcox | Jul 6, 2021
After eight weeks of exposure to ecologically plausible levels of methamphetamines, the fish tended to prefer meth-laced water over water without the drug.
Pandemic Lockdown Eases Mountain Lions’ Fear of Urban Areas
Pandemic Lockdown Eases Mountain Lions’ Fear of Urban Areas
Jef Akst | Jul 2, 2021
Six GPS-tracked wild cats wandered closer to Santa Cruz, California, and surrounding towns as human activity died down under shelter-in-place orders last March.
Tuna Story Exposes Challenges of Seafood Authentication
Tuna Story Exposes Challenges of Seafood Authentication
Christie Wilcox | Jul 1, 2021
A New York Times investigation’s failure to amplify tuna DNA from Subway’s tuna salad sandwiches likely says more about the complexities of identifying processed fish than about the ingredients.
First Immortal Cell Line Cultured for Reef-Building Corals
First Immortal Cell Line Cultured for Reef-Building Corals
Amanda Heidt | Jul 1, 2021
Lab-grown cells from the reef-building coral Acropora tenuis provide new opportunities to study bleaching, symbioses, and biomineralization.
Infographic: How Scientists Are Creating Coral Cell Lines
Infographic: How Scientists Are Creating Coral Cell Lines
Amanda Heidt | Jul 1, 2021
Stable, long-term cell lines will enable scientists to study everything from coral bleaching to biomineralization, knowledge that may help protect corals from ongoing climate change.
Scientists Go Down the Cicada Hole
Scientists Go Down the Cicada Hole
Lisa Winter | Jun 24, 2021
Brood X’s emergence tunnels—numbering in the hundreds per square meter of soil—give researchers a special opportunity to study how such extreme soil aeration affects the ecosystem.
Why Turkey’s Sea of Marmara Is Full of Marine Snot
Why Turkey’s Sea of Marmara Is Full of Marine Snot
Christie Wilcox | Jun 11, 2021
Turkish officials are scrambling to clean up a massive, gooey plankton bloom that’s sliming the country’s ports and could suffocate the area’s marine ecosystems.
Oxygen Levels Dropping in US and European Lakes: Study
Oxygen Levels Dropping in US and European Lakes: Study
Lisa Winter | Jun 7, 2021
Researchers find a widespread decline in dissolved oxygen levels in lakes, which is known to reshape ecosystems.
Sailing the Seas in Search of Microbes
Sailing the Seas in Search of Microbes
Shawna Williams | Jun 1, 2021
Projects aimed at collecting big data about the ocean’s tiniest life forms continue to expand our view of the seas.
Adriana L. Romero-Olivares Tracks Fungi’s Response to Climate Change
Adriana L. Romero-Olivares Tracks Fungi’s Response to Climate Change
Amanda Heidt | Jun 1, 2021
The New Mexico State University soil microbiologist uses molecular tools to understand how fungi are adapting to a warming world and what that might mean for global nutrient cycles.
Firefly Tourism Sparks Calls for Sustainable Practices
Firefly Tourism Sparks Calls for Sustainable Practices
Asher Jones | Jun 1, 2021
More and more people are traveling around the world to watch the luminous displays of fireflies, but tourism-related light pollution and habitat degradation threaten to snuff out the insects at some locations.  
Farmed Atlantic Salmon Likely Passed Virus to Wild Pacific Salmon
Farmed Atlantic Salmon Likely Passed Virus to Wild Pacific Salmon
Abby Olena | May 27, 2021
New genomic analyses reveal that piscine orthoreovirus first came to the Pacific in 1989, around the same time that salmon farms in the area started importing Atlantic salmon eggs from Europe.