Incest Isn’t Taboo in Nature: Study
Incest Isn’t Taboo in Nature: Study
Avoiding inbreeding appears to be the exception rather than the norm for animals, according to a new meta-analysis of experimental studies.
Incest Isn’t Taboo in Nature: Study
Incest Isn’t Taboo in Nature: Study

Avoiding inbreeding appears to be the exception rather than the norm for animals, according to a new meta-analysis of experimental studies.

Avoiding inbreeding appears to be the exception rather than the norm for animals, according to a new meta-analysis of experimental studies.

evolution
Whole-Genome Data Point to Four Species of Giraffe
Whole-Genome Data Point to Four Species of Giraffe
Ruth Williams | May 6, 2021
The genome sequences of 51 giraffes from all over Africa contribute to the latest attempt in an ongoing pursuit to pin down a species number.
Picozoans Are Algae After All: Study
Picozoans Are Algae After All: Study
Christie Wilcox | May 6, 2021
Phylogenomics data place the enigmatic plankton in the middle of the algal family tree, despite their apparent lack of plastids—an organelle characteristic of all other algae.
Infographic: Animals of Different Species Hybridize
Infographic: Animals of Different Species Hybridize
Ashley Yeager | May 1, 2021
The offspring of crosses between related species can sometimes fill a new environmental niche, and such hybridizations may even lead to speciation.
Hybrid Animals Are Not Nature’s Misfits
Hybrid Animals Are Not Nature’s Misfits
Ashley Yeager | May 1, 2021
In the 20th century, animals such as mules and ligers that had parents of different species were considered biological flukes, but genetic sequencing is beginning to unravel the critical role of hybridization in evolution.
Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern
Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern
Abby Olena | Apr 8, 2021
Impressions that ancient brains left in fossilized skulls reveal that the first human ancestors to migrate out of Africa had much more primitive brains than previously thought.
“Rogue” Protein Could Contribute to Humans’ High Cancer Rates
“Rogue” Protein Could Contribute to Humans’ High Cancer Rates
Asher Jones | Apr 1, 2021
A mutant protein called Siglec-XII may promote carcinoma progression in humans, but inactivation of its gene seems to avoid the problem, according to a study.
First Report of Horizontal Gene Transfer Between Plant and Animal
First Report of Horizontal Gene Transfer Between Plant and Animal
Emma Yasinski | Mar 25, 2021
Whiteflies overcome a toxin in plants they eat through the use of the plant’s own genetic protection, likely ferried from plant to insect millions of years ago by a virus.
Genome Reveals Clues to Giraffes’ “Blatantly Strange” Body Shape
Genome Reveals Clues to Giraffes’ “Blatantly Strange” Body Shape
Amanda Heidt | Mar 19, 2021
The physiological demands of that long neck get support from a gene involved in strengthening bones and blood vessels, researchers find after inserting the sequence in mice.
Lightning Might Have Sparked Early Life on Earth
Lightning Might Have Sparked Early Life on Earth
Asher Jones | Mar 17, 2021
Electrical storms, rather than meteorites as scientists had previously thought, could have unlocked phosphorus necessary for the development of ancient life, according to a new study.