Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern
Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern
Impressions that ancient brains left in fossilized skulls reveal that the first human ancestors to migrate out of Africa had much more primitive brains than previously thought.
Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern
Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern

Impressions that ancient brains left in fossilized skulls reveal that the first human ancestors to migrate out of Africa had much more primitive brains than previously thought.

Impressions that ancient brains left in fossilized skulls reveal that the first human ancestors to migrate out of Africa had much more primitive brains than previously thought.

evolution
“Rogue” Protein Could Contribute to Humans’ High Cancer Rates
“Rogue” Protein Could Contribute to Humans’ High Cancer Rates
Asher Jones | Apr 1, 2021
A mutant protein called Siglec-XII may promote carcinoma progression in humans, but inactivation of its gene seems to avoid the problem, according to a study.
First Report of Horizontal Gene Transfer Between Plant and Animal
First Report of Horizontal Gene Transfer Between Plant and Animal
Emma Yasinski | Mar 25, 2021
Whiteflies overcome a toxin in plants they eat through the use of the plant’s own genetic protection, likely ferried from plant to insect millions of years ago by a virus.
Genome Reveals Clues to Giraffes’ “Blatantly Strange” Body Shape
Genome Reveals Clues to Giraffes’ “Blatantly Strange” Body Shape
Amanda Heidt | Mar 19, 2021
The physiological demands of that long neck get support from a gene involved in strengthening bones and blood vessels, researchers find after inserting the sequence in mice.
Lightning Might Have Sparked Early Life on Earth
Lightning Might Have Sparked Early Life on Earth
Asher Jones | Mar 17, 2021
Electrical storms, rather than meteorites as scientists had previously thought, could have unlocked phosphorus necessary for the development of ancient life, according to a new study.
Cuttlefish Delay Gratification, a Sign of Smarts
Cuttlefish Delay Gratification, a Sign of Smarts
Asher Jones | Mar 5, 2021
The cephalopods resisted temptation for up to 130 seconds to earn their favorite food, hinting at sophisticated cognitive abilities such as planning for the future.
Free Fallin’: How Scientists Study Unrestrained Insects
Free Fallin’: How Scientists Study Unrestrained Insects
Amanda Heidt | Mar 1, 2021
Researchers are pulling from video games, sports broadcasting, meteorology, and even missile guidance technology to better investigate how insects have mastered flight.
Infographic: VR, Radar, and Other Tricks for Studying Insects
Infographic: VR, Radar, and Other Tricks for Studying Insects
Amanda Heidt | Mar 1, 2021
Researchers are getting creative to understand flight behavior in the fast-moving and tiny animals.
Lessons from Darwin’s “Mischievous” Birds
Lessons from Darwin’s “Mischievous” Birds
Jonathan Meiburg | Mar 1, 2021
An unsung group of South American falcons yields clues to the prehistory of a continent, and hints at secrets of the avian brain.
Questions Raised About How an Ancient Hominin Moved
Questions Raised About How an Ancient Hominin Moved
Abby Olena | Feb 24, 2021
A new analysis of the hand of the 4.4-million-year-old partial skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus indicates that the human ancestor may have climbed and swung through trees like chimpanzees do.