federal funding, developmental biology, evolution, culture
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Dec 1, 2011
Meet some of the people featured in the November/December 2011 issue of The Scientist.
Eye of Newt
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.
Teen DNA Detectives
Kerry Grens | Dec 1, 2011
Genomicist Mark Stoeckle and three high school students have taken do-it-yourself science to a new level. 
Newts' New Eyes
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 
Flow Cytometry for the Masses
Richard P. Grant | Dec 1, 2011
Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.
Barcode High
Kerry Grens | Dec 1, 2011
The story of a group of high school students who, with the help of a Rockefeller University researcher, conducted and published studies on the biological provenance of sushi and teas from around New York City.
Citizen Science Goes Marine
Jef Akst | Nov 30, 2011
A new public science project asks people at home to match whale songs in hopes of better understanding their language.
Cancer’s Escape Routes
Cancer’s Escape Routes
Tia Ghose | Nov 30, 2011
Scientists are beginning to discover myriad strategies tumors use to avoid attacks by anti-cancer drugs.
How Are We Doing?
The Scientist Staff | Nov 29, 2011
Let us know what you like about The Scientist, and how we can improve our coverage of the life sciences.
Evolutionary Pioneer Dies at 73
Edyta Zielinska | Nov 28, 2011
Lynn Margulis, an innovative thinker who proposed symbiosis as a major mechanism for speciation, passed away last week.