fertility, evolution, microbiology
Earliest Modern Europeans Described
Jef Akst | Nov 3, 2011
A fossilized jaw bone and teeth from Western Europe are recognized as the oldest modern human fossils recovered in the region.
Bacterial Rejuvenation
Edyta Zielinska | Oct 27, 2011
Bacteria age, but as a lineage, can live forever.
How Probiotic Yogurt Works
Bob Grant | Oct 26, 2011
Researchers show that the bacterial species in probiotic, fermented dairy products may alter gene expression and metabolism in native gut microbiota.
Wolbachia Boost Stem Cell Production
Jef Akst | Oct 20, 2011
The widespread bacteria known to manipulate host reproductive output can do so by ramping up stem cell division and consequent egg production in Drosophila.
Protection for Big-Screen Virus
Edyta Zielinska | Oct 19, 2011
Researchers find an antibody that may protect against a virus similar to the one featured in the movie Contagion.
New Genes, New Brain
Cristina Luiggi | Oct 19, 2011
A bevy of genes known to be active during human fetal and infant development first appeared at the same time that the prefrontal cortex—the area of the brain associated with human intelligence and personality—took shape in primates.
Behavior Brief
Jef Akst | Oct 17, 2011
A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research
Cellular Origins of Giant Viruses?
Cristina Luiggi | Oct 16, 2011
The largest virus to be sequenced prompts researchers to consider whether giant viruses were once full-fledged living organisms.
Climate-Shaped Arabidopsis Genome
Kerry Grens | Oct 6, 2011
Two genome-wide studies, backed up by field experiments, identify SNPs that correlate with Arabidopsis fitness in various climates.
Immunologists Take Home Nobel
Rachel Nuwer | Oct 3, 2011
The Nobel Assembly announced today that three researchers in the field of immunology will share the 2011 Prize in Physiology or Medicine.