flood, neuroscience
Contributors
Contributors
Jef Akst and Bob Grant | Nov 1, 2017
Meet some of the people featured in the November 2017 issue of The Scientist.
Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity
Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity
Sara B. Linker, Fred H. Gage, Tracy A. Bedrosian | Nov 1, 2017
No two neurons are alike. What does that mean for brain function?
Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier
Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier
Amanda B. Keener | Nov 1, 2017
To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.
Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain
Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain
Fred H. Gage, Tracy A. Bedrosian, Sara B. Linker | Oct 31, 2017
Recent advances in single-cell omics and other techniques are revealing variation at genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptomic levels.
Infographic: Breaking into the Brain
Infographic: Breaking into the Brain
Amanda B. Keener | Oct 31, 2017
The blood-brain barrier is a collection of specialized cells and proteins that control the movement of molecules from the blood to the central nervous system.
Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism
Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism
Ruth Williams | Oct 31, 2017
Newly designed sensors detect the magnetic fields generated by electrical activity within cat brains.
Memory Master
Memory Master
The Scientist Staff | Oct 31, 2017
Four-time USA Memory Champion Nelson Dellis reveals some of his memory-training tactics.
Fire Ant Rafts
Fire Ant Rafts
The Scientist Staff | Oct 31, 2017
The invasive insects weathered extreme climatic conditions by banding together and riding out Hurricane Harvey's flood waters.
Why Are Some People Altruistic?
Why Are Some People Altruistic?
The Scientist Staff | Oct 31, 2017
Researcher Abigail Marsh tells the tale of her very personal brush with extreme altruism.
Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses
Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses
The Scientist Staff | Oct 31, 2017
Researchers have used a modified rabies virus and fluorescent proteins to tag individual nerve cells in the mouse visual cortex.