Sound Waves Aid Brain Tumor Treatment
Sound Waves Aid Brain Tumor Treatment
In a small clinical study, focusing ultrasound beams on tumors in patients’ brains helped open the blood-brain barrier to facilitate drug delivery.
Sound Waves Aid Brain Tumor Treatment
Sound Waves Aid Brain Tumor Treatment

In a small clinical study, focusing ultrasound beams on tumors in patients’ brains helped open the blood-brain barrier to facilitate drug delivery.

In a small clinical study, focusing ultrasound beams on tumors in patients’ brains helped open the blood-brain barrier to facilitate drug delivery.

genetic privacy, neuroscience, ecology
Scientists Use Photosynthesis to Power an Animal’s Brain
Scientists Use Photosynthesis to Power an Animal’s Brain
Abby Olena | Oct 13, 2021
Injecting oxygen-generating algae into tadpoles allows brain activity to continue in the absence of oxygen, researchers find.
Neuroscientist Mortimer Mishkin Dies at 94
Neuroscientist Mortimer Mishkin Dies at 94
Lisa Winter | Oct 12, 2021
His work bridged the gap between psychology and neurobiology.
Repurposed Drug Reverses Signs of Alzheimer’s in Mice, Human Cells
Repurposed Drug Reverses Signs of Alzheimer’s in Mice, Human Cells
Jef Akst | Oct 12, 2021
Researchers say they hope to launch a clinical trial to test bumetanide, a diuretic approved in 2002, but how it might improve neural functioning is unclear.
Chinchilla Supplier Loses License over Animal Welfare Violations
Chinchilla Supplier Loses License over Animal Welfare Violations
Shawna Williams | Oct 11, 2021
Moulton Chinchilla Ranch, the main US source of the animals for research, had a years-long history of disturbing findings in USDA inspections.
Alzheimer’s Risk Gene Paradoxically Protects Against Memory Loss
Alzheimer’s Risk Gene Paradoxically Protects Against Memory Loss
Chloe Tenn | Oct 8, 2021
A new study links a variant of the apolipoprotein E gene called APOE ε4 to better memory in older age, even in the presence of amyloid plaques—a possible explanation for the variant’s persistence despite its association with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
Fish Poop a Big Player in Ocean Carbon Sequestration
Fish Poop a Big Player in Ocean Carbon Sequestration
Katarina Zimmer | Oct 8, 2021
A modeling study estimates that by drastically reducing fish biomass over the past century, industrial fishing may be affecting ocean chemistry, nutrient fluxes, and carbon cycling as much as climate change.
Neuroscientist Nadia Chaudhri Dies at 43
Neuroscientist Nadia Chaudhri Dies at 43
Lisa Winter | Oct 7, 2021
Knowingly facing the end of her life, she raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for underrepresented students in higher education.
R. Allen Gardner, Who Taught Chimps to Sign, Dies at 91
R. Allen Gardner, Who Taught Chimps to Sign, Dies at 91
Lisa Winter | Oct 5, 2021
Gardner famously claimed to have taught chimpanzees to communicate with people using American Sign Language by raising them as if they were human children.
Mechanisms of Chili’s Heat, Menthol’s Cool Garner Nobel
Mechanisms of Chili’s Heat, Menthol’s Cool Garner Nobel
Chloe Tenn | Oct 4, 2021
David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian won this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their research on the ion channels involved in perceiving heat, cold, pain, and touch.
Book Excerpt from <em>Thicker Than Water</em>
Book Excerpt from Thicker Than Water
Erica Cirino | Oct 1, 2021
In Chapter 5, "Pick Up the Pieces," author Erica Cirino investigates the potential health risks of the small plastic particles that permeate the planet.
Bianca Jones Marlin Traces How Sensory Inputs Shape the Brain
Bianca Jones Marlin Traces How Sensory Inputs Shape the Brain
Annie Melchor | Oct 1, 2021
The Columbia University neuroscientist researches the biology behind some of our most human experiences, including building family relationships. 
Neurons Simplify Visual Signals by Responding to Only One Retina
Neurons Simplify Visual Signals by Responding to Only One Retina
Anne N. Connor | Oct 1, 2021
Mice have neurons that connect to both eyes but only propagate the signal from one or the other, simplifying the information sent to the cerebral cortex.
Is Your Brain Wired for Numbers?
Is Your Brain Wired for Numbers?
Catherine Offord | Oct 1, 2021
Our perception of quantity, separate from counting or estimation of magnitude more generally, is foundational to human cognition, according to some neuroscientists.