a small brown mammal with a long nose
What Is This New Langya Virus? Do We Need to Be Worried?
Here’s what we know so far about a new virus detected in eastern China.
What Is This New Langya Virus? Do We Need to Be Worried?
What Is This New Langya Virus? Do We Need to Be Worried?

Here’s what we know so far about a new virus detected in eastern China.

Here’s what we know so far about a new virus detected in eastern China.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, CreativeNature_nl
germ cells, cell & molecular biology, microbiology, immunology
Four glass vials sit on a reflective tabletop next to a syringe. Each is labeled as a subsequent dose in a four-dose series of COVID-19 vaccines.
What We Know About Getting a Second Booster Shot of COVID-19 Vaccines
Dan Robitzski | Aug 11, 2022
Studies show that a fourth mRNA vaccine dose offers the elderly and other high-risk groups strong protection against hospitalization and death from COVID-19, but experts say benefits for other populations may be more limited.
Countless bats swarming in the evening dusk
Bat Coronaviruses May Infect Tens of Thousands of People Yearly
Andy Carstens | Aug 10, 2022
Parts of Southeast Asia where human and bat population densities are highest could be infection hotspots, a study finds.
A New Multiplexed SARS-CoV-2 Serological Assay Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
A New Multiplexed SARS-CoV-2 Serological Assay Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Aug 9, 2022
Julie Lovchik will discuss how advanced flow cytometry instrumentation facilitates multiplex assessment of IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.
Man in lab coat looking at the camera and smiling
Can Taking a Test Now Tell You if You’ve Already Had COVID-19?
Natalia Mesa | Aug 8, 2022
The Scientist asks Brigham and Women’s Hospital infectious disease specialist Lindsey Baden about testing for prior infections.
Artist&rsquo;s rendition of multiple <em>Neisseria gonorrhoeae</em>, the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, depicted as two spheres stuck together, each covered in tendrils.
Gonorrhea-Blocking Mutation Also Protects Against Alzheimer’s: Study
Holly Barker | Aug 5, 2022
Research traces the evolution of a gene variant that reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, finding that it originally evolved in response to infectious bacteria.
in love with the shape of you
In Love with the Shape of You: Physical Scaffolding Defines Organoid Patterning
Sejal Davla, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Controlling a growing tissue’s shape achieves deterministic and uniform patterning in intestinal organoids.
A twisted and folded illustration of single-stranded RNA in front of a blue background.
Deficient RNA Editing Implicated in Inflammatory Disease 
Alejandra Manjarrez | Aug 5, 2022
Genetic variants that reduce the editing levels of double-stranded RNA are associated with autoimmune and immune-mediated conditions, a study finds.
Illustration of bacteriophages infecting a bacterium
Phages Treat Gut Inflammation in Mice
Andy Carstens | Aug 4, 2022
Mixtures of viruses that attack inflammatory bowel disease–causing bacteria in mice also survive the digestive tract and are well-tolerated in humans, a study finds.
COVID-19 vaccine vials
COVID-19 Vaccines Induce Better Long-Term Immunity than Infection
Jennifer Zieba, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
For the first time, researchers performed a head-to head longitudinal study comparing the immune response elicited by mRNA and traditional COVID-19 vaccines to primary infections.
Magical fairytale forest. Coniferous forest covered of green moss. Mystic atmosphere.
The Unusual Functions of Geosmin
Connor Lynch | Aug 1, 2022
The compounds responsible for the earthy smell of recent rain are produced by a wide variety of bacteria and fungi. Recent research sheds light on why microbes bother.
Microscopy image of a cricket embryo, illuminated in green, pinched near one end, with one side full of bright green dots representing cell nuclei
How Wandering Nuclei Shape Developing Embryos
Viviane Callier | Jul 29, 2022
As cricket blastoderms form, cell nuclei are pulled into an egg’s remaining empty space to form the new cell layers that will shape the developing animal.
An abstract stained-glass portrait of a woman with an image of an eye representing the brain
Through the Looking Glass: Aging, Inflammation, and Gut Rejuvenation
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Renewing the aging gut microbiome holds promise for preventing inflammatory brain and eye degeneration.
metallic-looking illustration of coronavirus structure
How the Omicron Subvariant BA.5 Became a Master of Disguise—and What It Means for the Current COVID-19 Surge
Suresh V. Kuchipudi | Jul 26, 2022
Several mechanisms contribute to the increased transmissibility of this SARS-CoV-2 variant.
Calm lake reflecting sky with boat in foreground
Plastic Pollution Boosts Bacterial Growth in Lake Water
Patience Asanga | Jul 26, 2022
A study finds that not only did aquatic bacteria thrive when chemicals washed from degrading plastic were introduced into lake water, they also broke down organic matter more efficiently.
A person holding a section of his face and looking in to his brain through a magnifying glass stock illustration
Science Philosophy in a Flash - A Look at Aging Through Young Eyes 
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Aimée Parker shares how her childlike curiosity and collaborative spirit motivate her scientific pursuits.
Ribbon diagram of the protein coat of an adeno-associated virus
Preprints Propose Constellation of Causes for Kids’ Liver Disease
Christie Wilcox | Jul 25, 2022
Two independent groups suggest the suite of recent unexplained hepatitis cases may stem from coinfection with an adeno-associated virus and a helper adeno- or herpesvirus, a duo which may be especially virulent in children with a particular genetic variant.
Fluorescent cells in culture connected by tunneling nanotubules
SARS-CoV-2 Could Use Nanotubes to Infect the Brain
Natalia Mesa | Jul 21, 2022
Stressed cells can form hollow actin bridges to neighbors to get help, but the virus may hijack these tiny tunnels for its own purposes, a study suggests.
Motor neurons, undergoing degeneration in ALS
Mutant T Cells That Drive Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Progression May React To a Brain Antigen
Nele Haelterman, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Scientists discovered a possibly autoreactive T cell population that forecasts and supports disease progression.
Spherical colonies of <em>Vibrio splendidus&nbsp;</em>bacteria
Inside Versus Out: A New Form of Bacterial Cooperation
Natalia Mesa | Jul 20, 2022
Oceanic bacteria form a transient spherical community to conquer large food sources, taking on different roles to break down the bounty more efficiently.