global warming, developmental biology, neuroscience
Pigeon GPS Identified
Megan Scudellari | Apr 26, 2012
A population of neurons in pigeon brains encodes direction, intensity, and polarity of the Earth’s magnetic field.
New Brain Stem Cell
Cristina Luiggi | Apr 23, 2012
Progenitor cells discovered in the brain’s small blood vessels have the capacity to differentiate into neurons and other tissue types.
Polar Bear More Ancient Than Realized
Jef Akst | Apr 20, 2012
A genetic analysis reveals that the polar bear split from the brown bear some 600,000 years ago.
Melting Ice Releases Ancient Microbes
Megan Scudellari | Apr 19, 2012
Living cells escaping from Antarctic glaciers could speed global warming and affect marine life.
Brain Controls Paralyzed Muscles
Ed Yong | Apr 18, 2012
A new system decodes brain signals from the motor cortex of monkeys and translates them into basic arm movements, despite temporary paralysis.
Forgetting Drug Addiction
Cristina Luiggi | Apr 16, 2012
Researchers weaken the memories of drug use in recovering addicts.
Monkeys “Read” Writing
Megan Scudellari | Apr 12, 2012
Baboons are able to distinguish printed English words from nonsense sequences of letters—the first step in the reading process.
The Two Faces of Metastasis
Suling Liu, Hasan Korkaya, and Max S. Wicha | Apr 1, 2012
During development, the cells of an embryo change their pattern of gene expression, which allows them to detach from their original location and migrate to another part of the embryo, where the pattern changes again to allow formation of a new organ.
Speaking of Science
The Scientist Staff | Apr 1, 2012
April 2012's selection of notable quotes
Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?
Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?
Suling Liu, Hasan Korkaya, and Max S. Wicha | Apr 1, 2012
A flood of new discoveries has refined our definition of cancer stem cells. Now it’s up to human clinical trials to test if they can make a difference in patients.