ISTOCK, DIMIJANA
Fruit Fly Males Woo Females with Three Songs, Not Two
Fruit Fly Males Woo Females with Three Songs, Not Two
Researchers show that Drosophila melanogaster males are capable of producing more modes of courtship song with their wings than previously thought.
Fruit Fly Males Woo Females with Three Songs, Not Two
Fruit Fly Males Woo Females with Three Songs, Not Two

Researchers show that Drosophila melanogaster males are capable of producing more modes of courtship song with their wings than previously thought.

Researchers show that Drosophila melanogaster males are capable of producing more modes of courtship song with their wings than previously thought.

grasshoppers, Drosophila
Image of the Day: Electrify
Image of the Day: Electrify
Sukanya Charuchandra | Aug 9, 2018
Researchers have identified what makes synapses strong or weak in fruit flies.
Fruit Fly Geneticist Bruce Baker Dies
Fruit Fly Geneticist Bruce Baker Dies
Diana Kwon | Jul 30, 2018
The Stanford University professor was known for his work on sex determination and courtship in flies.
Image of the Day: Snapshot
Image of the Day: Snapshot
Sukanya Charuchandra | Jul 20, 2018
Scientists map the fruit fly brain, giving an in-depth look at its neurons.
Fruit Fly Geneticist Dan Lindsley Dies
Fruit Fly Geneticist Dan Lindsley Dies
Kerry Grens | Jun 26, 2018
A leader in the Drosophila community, the UCSD professor was well known for his so-called Red Book of fruit fly genetics.
Image of the Day: Fly Sight
Image of the Day: Fly Sight
The Scientist Staff | Sep 4, 2017
In the developing Drosophila visual system, signals from glia cultivate the growth of neurons from immature cells.
Behavior Brief
Behavior Brief
Beth Marie Mole | Dec 5, 2012
A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research
Love and Crickets
Cristina Luiggi | Aug 12, 2011
A new exhibit at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia celebrates the work of an artist who is also the world’s authority on grasshoppers and crickets.
Chasing Grasshoppers
Cristina Luiggi | Aug 12, 2011
A conversation with Dan Otte, a South African artist and curator of entomology at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. Otte also happens to have discovered around 20 percent of the cricket species known to date.