Aggressive Cancers Feed Off the Brain’s Nerves
Aggressive Cancers Feed Off the Brain’s Nerves
Three studies show that tumor cells can behave like neurons.
Aggressive Cancers Feed Off the Brain’s Nerves
Aggressive Cancers Feed Off the Brain’s Nerves

Three studies show that tumor cells can behave like neurons.

Three studies show that tumor cells can behave like neurons.

hESCs, cell & molecular biology
Proton Channel for Sensing Sour Taste Identified in Mice
Emily Makowski | Sep 19, 2019
Otopetrin-1 was previously only known for its role in the inner ear, but it turns out it also forms a pH-detecting pore in the tongue’s sour taste receptors.
Image of the Day: Actin Assembly
Emily Makowski | Sep 17, 2019
Microtubules need actin to disassemble focal adhesions, allowing for cell movement.
Chemist Christopher Dobson Dies
Ashley Yeager | Sep 16, 2019
The University of Cambridge scholar’s research on folding proteins advanced scientists’ understanding of illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and type 2 diabetes.
young man vaping
Scientists Study Vaping’s Harm as Second Death Reported
Nicoletta Lanese | Sep 5, 2019
In light of recent reports of electronic-cigarette–related illness and death, UNC Chapel Hill professor Robert Tarran discusses the dangerous effects of e-liquids on the lungs.
Image of the Day: White Blood Cell Webs
Emily Makowski | Sep 5, 2019
Neutrophil extracellular traps may hold clues to the cause of skin lesions in patients with a painful condition called hidradenitis suppurativa.
Infographic: How to Catch Cheating Athletes
Anna Azvolinsky | Sep 1, 2019
Anti-doping agencies are tracking levels of various molecules in athletes’ blood and urine over time to increase their ability to detect drug misuse.
The Race to Nab Cheating Athletes
Anna Azvolinsky | Sep 1, 2019
Anti-doping organizations are constantly developing new tests to catch athletes trying to boost their performance in increasingly sophisticated ways.
Cigall Kadoch Unravels Chromatin’s Role in Cancer
Chia-Yi Hou | Sep 1, 2019
The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researcher is developing cancer therapeutics based on how the physical structure of DNA contributes to the disease.
Infographic: Open and shut
Chia-Yi Hou | Sep 1, 2019
Researchers devise a way to make plants’ stomata open and close more quickly.
How Evolution Made the Highveld Mole Rat Impervious to Ant Stings
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2019
Researchers identify changes to a pain receptor and to an ion channel that appear to enable the rodents to colonize otherwise inhospitable burrows.
A Synthetic Ion Channel Makes Plants Grow Faster
Chia-Yi Hou | Sep 1, 2019
Arabidopsis with guard cells modified by a light-activated potassium ion channel can open and close stomata more quickly, conserving water.
mouse foot 28 days post chikungunya infection
Image of the Day: Viral Residue
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 30, 2019
Genetic material from the chikungunya virus remains in mouse cells after infection and may be linked to later joint pain.
RNA droplets
Image of the Day: Liquid Compartments
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 28, 2019
Membraneless organelles appear highly sensitive to ion concentrations in their environment.
human macrophage
Image of the Day: Alzheimer’s Genes
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 19, 2019
Mutations within the MS4A gene cluster have been linked to changes in protein levels that affect disease risk.
schwann cells
Special Schwann Cells in Mice Play Unsung Role in Pain
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 16, 2019
The glia seem to make up part of a newly described sensory organ, the discoverers suggest.
Exercise Changes Our Gut Microbes, But How Isn’t Yet Clear
Ashley Yeager | Aug 15, 2019
Physical activity, independent of diet, shifts the composition of bacteria in the intestines, spurring researchers to search for species that might provide benefits akin to working out.
shinkai submersible
Elusive Asgard Archaea Finally Cultured in Lab
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 12, 2019
The 12-year-long endeavor reveals Prometheoarchaeum as a tentacled cell, living in a symbiotic relationship with methane-producing microbes.
arida1 pi3ka gene endometriosis uterine cancer uterus cell migration
Two Genes Conspire in Endometriosis and Cancer to Help Cells Migrate
Emma Yasinski | Aug 9, 2019
The genes promote the migration of endothelial cells outside of the uterus, a characteristic of both endometriosis and endometrial cancers, a study of mice and human tissue finds.
Tardigrades May Have Made it to the Moon
Ashley Yeager | Aug 7, 2019
An Israeli lunar lander carrying the tiny animals crashed into the moon in April, and now scientists are trying to determine if the creatures are still alive.