history, developmental biology
Short, Strong Signals
Short, Strong Signals
Ruth Williams | Mar 25, 2015
Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.
<em>Apiarium</em>, 1625
Apiarium, 1625
Kerry Grens | Mar 1, 2015
Galileo’s improvements to the microscope led to the first published observations using such an instrument.
Scientific Publishing, 1665
Scientific Publishing, 1665
Jef Akst | Feb 1, 2015
Henry Oldenburg founded Philosophical Transactions to share scholarly news from the “Ingenious in many considerable parts of the World.”
Centennial <em>Shigella</em>
Centennial Shigella
Jef Akst | Feb 1, 2015
A strain of the dysentery-causing bacterium isolated in 1915 tells the story of a young soldier who died of the disease in the early days of World War I.
The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736
The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736
Kerry Grens | Jan 1, 2015
Carl Linnaeus’s plant classification system was doomed, and he knew it.
Fertility Treatment Fallout
Fertility Treatment Fallout
Jyoti Madhusoodanan | Jan 1, 2015
Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.
Capsule Reviews
Capsule Reviews
Bob Grant | Jan 1, 2015
Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons
NIH Study Canceled
NIH Study Canceled
Jef Akst | Dec 15, 2014
The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.
Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found
Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found
Kerry Grens | Dec 5, 2014
Archaeologists report that a shell with geometric engravings was carved by a Homo erectus hundreds of thousands of years ago.
Royal Remains Confirmed
Royal Remains Confirmed
Molly Sharlach | Dec 3, 2014
Bones unearthed in 2012 are likely those of King Richard III, a new DNA analysis shows.